• Publications
  • Influence
Empire and Revolution: The Political Life of Edmund Burke
Edmund Burke (1730-97) lived during one of the most extraordinary periods of world history. He grappled with the significance of the British Empire in India, fought for reconciliation with the
Enlightenment, Revolution and Democracy
Modern conceptions of democracy are for the most part static. Very often they are ideologically programmatic too. There is a connection between these two aspects of democratic theory. Static
PARTY, PARLIAMENT, AND CONQUEST IN NEWLY ASCRIBED BURKE MANUSCRIPTS*
  • R. Bourke
  • History
    The Historical Journal
  • 3 August 2012
ABSTRACT This article presents four manuscript essays from the mid-1750s, three of which are attributed to Edmund Burke for the first time. In doing so, the article aims to reconstruct Burke's
Political Judgement: Essays for John Dunn
Introduction Richard Bourke and Raymond Geuss Part I. The Character of Political Judgement: 1. What is political judgement? Raymond Geuss 2. Sticky judgement and the role of rhetoric Victoria McGeer
Romantic Discourse and Political Modernity: Wordsworth, the Intellectual and Cultural Critique
Introduction. qbo-The Strategy of Denegation.-qbo Criticism, Modernity and the Organic Tradition. Custom and Dominion: Tintern Abbey. Arnold, Hazlitt: 'Roads to Wordsworth'. qbo-Restoration and
Popular Sovereignty in Historical Perspective
Introduction Richard Bourke 1. Athenian democracy and popular tyranny Kinch Hoekstra 2. Popular sovereignty as control of officeholders: Aristotle on Greek democracy Melissa Lane 3. Popular
POCOCK AND THE PRESUPPOSITIONS OF THE NEW BRITISH HISTORY*
  • R. Bourke
  • History
    The Historical Journal
  • 17 August 2010
ABSTRACT This article recovers the rationale behind the project to found a ‘new’ British history undertaken by J. G. A. Pocock in the early 1970s, and contrasts this with the approach adopted in the
Languages of Conflict and the Northern Ireland Troubles*
  • R. Bourke
  • Political Science
    The Journal of Modern History
  • 1 September 2011
Accounts of civil breakdown and the emergence of political violence in modern societies are widely subject to theories of conflict that fail to represent reality. The frameworks for depicting extreme
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