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The malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum undergoes antigenic variation to evade host immune responses through switching expression of variant surface proteins encoded by the var gene family. We demonstrate that both a subtelomeric transgene and var genes are subject to reversible gene silencing. Var gene silencing involves the SIR complex as gene(More)
To establish infection in the host, malaria parasites export remodeling and virulence proteins into the erythrocyte. These proteins can traverse a series of membranes, including the parasite membrane, the parasitophorous vacuole membrane, and the erythrocyte membrane. We show that a conserved pentameric sequence plays a central role in protein export into(More)
The increased transcription of the Cyp6g1 gene of Drosophila melanogaster, and consequent resistance to insecticides such as DDT, is a widely cited example of adaptation mediated by cis-regulatory change. A fragment of an Accord transposable element inserted upstream of the Cyp6g1 gene is causally associated with resistance and has spread to high(More)
The invasion of host cells by the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum requires specific protein-protein interactions between parasite and host receptors and an intracellular translocation machinery to power the process. The transmembrane erythrocyte binding protein-175 (EBA-175) and thrombospondin-related anonymous protein (TRAP) play central roles in(More)
Serine repeat antigens (SERAs) are a family of secreted "cysteine-like" proteases of Plasmodium parasites. Several SERAs possess an atypical active-site serine residue in place of the canonical cysteine. The human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum possesses six "serine-type" (SERA1 to SERA5 and SERA9) and three "cysteine-type" (SERA6 to SERA8) SERAs.(More)
Central to the pathology of malaria disease are the repeated cycles of parasite invasion and destruction of human erythrocytes. In Plasmodium falciparum, the most virulent species causing malaria, erythrocyte invasion involves several specific receptor-ligand interactions that direct the pathway used to invade the host cell, with parasites varying in their(More)
The primary pathophysiological events contributing to fatal malaria are the cerebral syndrome, anemia, and lactic acidosis. The molecular basis of each event has been unclear. In the present study, microarray analysis of murine transcriptional responses during the development of severe disease revealed temporal, organ-specific, and pathway-specific(More)
A suite of polymorphic microsatellite markers and the complete mitochondrial genome sequence was developed by next generation sequencing (NGS) for the critically endangered orange-bellied parrot, Neophema chrysogaster. A total of 14 polymorphic loci were identified and characterized using DNA extractions representing 40 individuals from Melaleuca, Tasmania,(More)
We map 114 gene gains and 74 gene losses in the P450 gene family across the phylogeny of 12 Drosophila species by examining the congruence of gene trees and species trees. Although the number of P450 genes varies from 74 to 94 in the species examined, we infer that there were at least 77 P450 genes in the ancestral Drosophila genome. One of the most(More)
Widespread use of insecticides has led to insecticide resistance in many populations of insects. In some populations, resistance has evolved to multiple pesticides. In Drosophila melanogaster, resistance to multiple classes of insecticide is due to the overexpression of a single cytochrome P450 gene, Cyp6g1. Overexpression of Cyp6g1 appears to have evolved(More)