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Epidemiological studies suggest that smoking during pregnancy and passive exposure of children to cigarette smoke may increase the cancer risk in children and young adults. We have previously shown that the tobacco-specific nitrosamine 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK) is an active transplacental carcinogen in Syrian golden hamsters when(More)
Our previous studies have demonstrated that doses of 300–50 mg/kg 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK) injected subcutaneously into pregnant hamsters cause a 44% incidence of respiratorytract tumors in the offspring. In this study, we have extended the assay of the carcinogenic potency of NNK to doses ranging from 50 mg to 0.05 mg/kg body(More)
Members of the cytochrome P4502E and 2B gene families have been implicated in the activation of nitrosamines to reactive species capable of binding to cellular macromolecules and initiating tumor formation in various rodent species. This study was initiated to determine the relative prevalence of these isozymes and their response to ethanol during pregnancy(More)
The tobacco-specific N-nitrosamine 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1- butanone (NNK) is a potent tumorigen in adult Syrian golden hamsters and an active transplacental carcinogen in this species. In this study, we have investigated the biodistribution and metabolism of NNK in maternal and fetal hamster tissues as a function of the dose and the time(More)
The tobacco-specific N-nitrosamino 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK) is a potent carcinogen in adult Syrian golden hamsters and causes a high incidence of tumors in the offspring of hamsters after in utero exposure. We have investigated how pregnancy and/or ethanol treatment modulates the microsomal metabolism of NNK. Pregnancy decreased(More)
Hereditary tyrosinemia type I (HTI) is the most severe disease of the tyrosine degradation pathway. HTI is caused by a deficiency of fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase (FAH), the enzyme responsible for the hydrolysis of fumarylacetoacetate (FAA). As a result, there is an accumulation of metabolites such as maleylacetoacetate, succinylacetone, and FAA. The latter(More)
The tobacco-specific N-nitrosamine 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK) is a potent carcinogen in Syrian golden hamsters exposed pre- or postnatally to NNK. NNK requires metabolic activation, mainly by the cytochrome P-450 monooxygenase system, to exert its carcinogenic activity. Along with carcinogens, tobacco smoke contains other(More)
BACKGROUND/AIMS The AKT survival pathway is involved in a wide variety of human cancers. We investigated the implication of this pathway in hereditary tyrosinemia type 1 (HT1), a metabolic disease exhibiting hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), despite treatment with 2-(2-nitro-4-trifluoromethylbenzoyl)-1,3-cyclohexadione (NTBC) which prevents liver damage. HT1(More)
Hereditary tyrosinemia type 1 (HT1) is a recessive disease caused by a deficiency of the enzyme fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase (FAH) that catalyzes the conversion of fumarylacetoacetate (FAA) into fumarate and acetoacetate. In mice models of HT1, FAH deficiency causes death within the first 24h after birth. Administration of(More)
Hereditary tyrosinemia type 1 (HT1) is an autosomal recessive disease severely affecting liver and kidney and is caused by a deficiency in fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase (FAH). Administration of 2-(2-nitro-4-trifluoro-methylbenzyol)-1,3 cyclohexanedione (NTBC) improves the HT1 phenotype but some patients do not respond to NTBC therapy. The objective of the(More)