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Intracranial inoculation of Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) leads to the development of a chronic demyelinating disorder in certain mouse strains. Development of this disease is controlled by at least two unlinked genes, one of which is within or linked to the H-2 complex. In the present study, we attempted to map the relevant H-2 loci(More)
After intracerebral inoculation of Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV), certain mouse strains develop a persistent central nervous system (CNS) infection and inflammatory demyelinating lesions containing infiltrates of mononuclear cells and macrophages. Previous findings demonstrating a strong correlation between disease incidence, the presence(More)
Previous studies using mouse strains with limited genetic differences and H-2 haplotypes demonstrated that susceptibility to Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV)-induced demyelinating disease strongly correlated with chronically high levels of TMEV-specific delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH), but not with TMEV-specific T cell proliferation(More)
Knowledge of the cells in which Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) persists is crucial to understanding the pathogenesis of TMEV-induced demyelinating disease; however, it is still uncertain whether oligodendrocytes or macrophages are the primary target for persistence. In this study, mononuclear cells (MNC) isolated directly from central(More)
Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) produces a chronic, inflammatory demyelinating disease in susceptible mouse strains that is used as a model for multiple sclerosis. Because disease susceptibility correlates temporally with the development of virus-specific delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) responses, we studied methods and mechanisms by(More)
Following intracerebral inoculation of Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV), susceptible mouse strains develop a chronic demyelinating disease characterized by mononuclear cell-rich infiltrates in the central nervous system. Current evidence strongly supports an immune-mediated basis for myelin breakdown, with an effector role proposed for(More)
Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV)-induced demyelinating disease serves as a relevant animal model of human multiple sclerosis. Myelin damage induced by TMEV infection appears to be immune mediated. Disease susceptibility correlates best with the temporal development of chronic, high levels of TMEV-specific, MHC class II-restricted delayed-type(More)
Following intracerebral inoculation of Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV), susceptible mouse strains develop a chronic demyelinating disease characterized histologically by mononuclear cell-rich infiltrates in the central nervous system (CNS). An immune-mediated basis for this disease is strongly supported by previous studies demonstrating a(More)
Relapsing experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (R-EAE) in SJL/J mice was examined in relation to the development of neuroantigen-specific T cell proliferative (Tprlf) and delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) responses. R-EAE was induced by injecting syngeneic mouse spinal cord homogenate in CFA on days 0 and 7 over the shaved flanks of female SJL/J mice.(More)
Humoral antibody responses to Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) capsid proteins were examined. Rabbit antisera produced against the native BeAn strain of TMEV and against the isolated capsid proteins (VP1, VP2 and VP3) were tested for their ability to bind or neutralize virus and to inhibit the virus-induced haemagglutination of human O+(More)