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Microsomal epoxide hydrolase (mEH) is a bifunctional protein that plays a crucial role in the metabolism of numerous xenobiotics as well as in mediating the hepatic sodium-dependent uptake of bile acids that are involved in numerous physiological processes including the regulation of cholesterol metabolism. The transcription factors and nuclear receptors(More)
Microsomal epoxide hydrolase (mEH) is a bifunctional protein that plays a central role in carcinogen metabolism and is also able to mediate the sodium-dependent uptake of bile acids into hepatocytes. Studies have identified a subject (S-1) with extremely elevated serum bile salt levels in the absence of observable hepatocellular injury, suggesting a defect(More)
Microsomal epoxide hydrolase (mEH) plays a central role in xenobiotic metabolism as well as mediating the sodium-dependent uptake of bile acids into the liver, where these compounds regulate numerous biological processes such as cholesterol metabolism and hepatocyte signaling pathways. Little is known, however, about the factors that control the(More)
The bifunctional hepatic protein, microsomal epoxide hydrolase (mEH), plays a central role in the metabolism of many xenobiotics as well as mediating the Na(+)-dependent uptake of bile acids in parallel with the Na(+)-taurocholate co-transporting protein (ntcp). Previous studies have established that mEH is expressed in the endoplasmic reticulum with two(More)
From the ‡Center for Craniofacial Molecular Biology and **Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90033 and ¶Department of Molecular and Integrative Physiology, University of Michigan Medical School, Michigan 48109-0622, USA. Running Title: Mouse amelogenin gene regulation §Address(More)
Microsomal epoxide hydrolase (mEH) is a bifunctional protein that plays a central role in the metabolism of numerous xenobiotics as well as mediating the sodium-dependent transport of bile acids into hepatocytes where they are involved in cholesterol excretion and metabolism, lipid digestion and regulating numerous signaling pathways. Previous studies have(More)
Microsomal epoxide hydrolase (mEH) is a bifunctional protein that plays a central role in the metabolism of numerous xenobiotics as well as mediating the sodium-dependent transport of bile acids into hepatocytes. These compounds are involved in cholesterol homeostasis, lipid digestion, excretion of xenobiotics and the regulation of several nuclear receptors(More)
Monoamine oxidase A and B (MAO A and B) play important roles in the metabolism of biogenic and dietary amines and are encoded by two genes derived from a common ancestral gene. The promoter regions for human MAO A and B genes have been characterized using a series of 5’ flanking sequences linked to a human growth hormone reporter gene. When these constructs(More)
Amelogenin is the major protein component of the forming enamel matrix. In situ hybridization revealed a periodicity for amelogenin mRNA hybridization signals ranging from low to high transcript abundance on serial sections of developing mouse teeth. This in vivo observation led us to examine the amelogenin promoter for the activity of transcription(More)
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