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BACKGROUND The simian malaria parasite, Plasmodium knowlesi, can cause severe and fatal disease in humans yet it is rarely included in routine public health reporting systems for malaria and its geographical range is largely unknown. Because malaria caused by P. knowlesi is a truly neglected tropical disease, there are substantial obstacles to defining the(More)
  • Arnaud Chêne, Daria Donati, André Ortlieb Guerreiro-Cacais, Victor Levitsky, Qijun Chen, Kerstin I Falk +4 others
  • 2007
Although malaria and Epstein-Barr (EBV) infection are recognized cofactors in the genesis of endemic Burkitt lymphoma (BL), their relative contribution is not understood. BL, the most common paediatric cancer in equatorial Africa, is a high-grade B cell lymphoma characterized by c-myc translocation. EBV is a ubiquitous B lymphotropic virus that persists in(More)
  • Kirsten Moll, Arnaud Chêne, Ulf Ribacke, Osamu Kaneko, Sandra Nilsson, Gerhard Winter +5 others
  • 2007
Plasmodium falciparum malaria is brought about by the asexual stages of the parasite residing in human red blood cells (RBC). Contact between the erythrocyte surface and the merozoite is the first step for successful invasion and proliferation of the parasite. A number of different pathways utilised by the parasite to adhere and invade the host RBC have(More)
BACKGROUND The expression of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli is an important and frequently used tool within malaria research, however, this method remains problematic. High A/T versus C/G content and frequent lysine and arginine repeats in the Plasmodium falciparum genome are thought to be the main reason for early termination in the mRNA(More)
Although well studied in vitro, the in vivo functions of G-quadruplexes (G4-DNA and G4-RNA) are only beginning to be defined. Recent studies have demonstrated enrichment for sequences with intramolecular G-quadruplex forming potential (QFP) in transcriptional promoters of humans, chickens and bacteria. Here we survey the yeast genome for QFP sequences and(More)
Erythrocytes infected with mature forms of Plasmodium falciparum do not circulate but are withdrawn from the peripheral circulation; they are bound to the endothelial lining and to uninfected erythrocytes in the microvasculature. Blockage of the blood flow, hampered oxygen delivery, and severe malaria may follow if binding is excessive. The NH(2)-terminal(More)
— Mobile robots rely on their ability of scene recognition to build a topological map of the environment and perform location-related tasks. In this paper, we describe a novel lightweight scene recognition method using an adaptive descriptor which is based on color features and geometric information for omnidirectional vision. Our method enables the robot(More)
Severe Plasmodium falciparum malaria is characterized by excessive sequestration of infected and uninfected erythrocytes in the microvasculature of the affected organ. Rosetting, the adhesion of P. falciparum-infected erythrocytes to uninfected erythrocytes is a virulent parasite phenotype associated with the occurrence of severe malaria. Here we report on(More)