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Activity-induced modification of neuronal connections is essential for the development of the nervous system and may also underlie learning and memory functions of mature brain. Previous studies have shown an increase in dendritic spine density and/or enlargement of spines after the induction of long-term potentiation (LTP). Using two-photon time-lapse(More)
The cyclinT1/Cdk9 heterodimer that constitutes core P-TEFb is generally presumed to be the transcriptionally active form for stimulating RNA polymerase II elongation. About half of cellular P-TEFb also exists in an inactive complex with the 7SK snRNA and the HEXIM1 protein. Here, we show that the remaining half associates with the bromodomain protein Brd4.(More)
Dynamic regulation of AMPA-type glutamate receptors represents a primary mechanism for controlling synaptic strength, though mechanisms for this process are poorly understood. The palmitoylated postsynaptic density protein, PSD-95, regulates synaptic plasticity and associates with the AMPA receptor trafficking protein, stargazin. Here, we identify palmitate(More)
The positive transcriptional elongation factor b (P-TEFb), consisting of CDK9 and cyclin T, stimulates transcription by phosphorylating RNA polymerase II. It becomes inactivated when associated with the abundant 7SK snRNA. Here, we show that the 7SK binding alone was not sufficient to inhibit P-TEFb. P-TEFb was inhibited by the HEXIM1 protein in a process(More)
Regulation of the elongation phase of transcription by RNA polymerase II (Pol II) is utilized extensively to generate the pattern of mRNAs needed to specify cell types and to respond to environmental changes. After Pol II initiates, negative elongation factors cause it to pause in a promoter proximal position. These polymerases are poised to respond to the(More)
Recruitment of the P-TEFb kinase by HIV-1 Tat to the viral promoter triggers the phosphorylation and escape of RNA polymerase II from promoter-proximal pausing. It is unclear, however, if Tat recruits additional host factors that further stimulate HIV-1 transcription. Using a sequential affinity-purification scheme, we have identified human transcription(More)
The positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb), consisting of Cdk9 and cyclin T, stimulates RNA polymerase II elongation and cotranscriptional pre-mRNA processing. To accommodate different growth conditions and transcriptional demands, a reservoir of P-TEFb is kept in an inactive state in the multisubunit 7SK snRNP. Under certain stress or disease(More)
Persistent synaptic modifications are essential for experience-dependent refinement of developing circuits. However, in the developing Xenopus retinotectal system, activity-induced synaptic modifications were quickly reversed either by subsequent spontaneous activity in the tectum or by exposure to random visual inputs. This reversal depended on the burst(More)
The positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb), comprising CDK9 and cyclin T, stimulates transcription of cellular and viral genes by phosphorylating RNA polymerase II. A major portion of nuclear P-TEFb is sequestered and inactivated by the coordinated actions of the 7SK snRNA and the HEXIM1 protein, whose induced dissociation from P-TEFb is(More)
The positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) stimulates transcriptional elongation by phosphorylating the carboxy-terminal domain of RNA polymerase II and antagonizing the effects of negative elongation factors. Not only is P-TEFb essential for transcription of the vast majority of cellular genes, but it is also a critical host cellular cofactor(More)