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The complete (172,282 base pairs) nucleotide sequence of the B95-8 strain of Epstein-Barr virus has been established using the dideoxynucleotide/M13 sequencing procedure. Many RNA polymerase II promoters have been mapped and the mRNAs from these promoters have been assigned to the latent or early/late productive virus cycles. Likely protein-coding regions(More)
Alu elements have amplified in primate genomes through a RNA-dependent mechanism, termed retroposition, and have reached a copy number in excess of 500,000 copies per human genome. These elements have been proposed to have a number of functions in the human genome, and have certainly had a major impact on genomic architecture. Alu elements continue to(More)
Short interspersed elements (SINEs) may be found in the genomes of a wide variety of mammals (Deininger and Batzer 1993). The Alu family of SINEs is one of the most successful mobile genetic elements, having arisen to a copy number in excess of 500,000 within the human genome in approximately 65 million years of primate evolution. Alu sequences are thought(More)
Genomic database mining has been a very useful aid in the identification and retrieval of recently integrated Alu elements from the human genome. We analyzed Alu elements retrieved from the GenBank database and identified two new Alu subfamilies, Alu Yb9 and Alu Yc2, and further characterized Yc1 subfamily members. Some members of each of the three(More)
Alu elements comprise >10% of the human genome. We have used a computational biology approach to analyze the human genomic DNA sequence databases to determine the impact of gene conversion on the sequence diversity of recently integrated Alu elements and to identify Alu elements that were potentially retroposition competent. We analyzed 269 Alu Ya5 elements(More)
Newly isolated members of two recently propagated (young) Alu subfamilies were examined for sequence diversity and insertion polymorphism in primate genomes. The smaller subfamily (termed HS-2) is comprised of approximately 5 to 25 members, while the larger (termed Sb2) includes approximately 125 to 600 members. Individual members of these Alu subfamilies(More)
The Alu family of interspersed repeats is comprised of over 500,000 members which may be divided into discrete subfamilies based upon mutations held in common between members. Distinct subfamilies of Alu sequences have amplified within the human genome in recent evolutionary history. Several individual Alu family members have amplified so recently in human(More)
The human short interspersed repeated element (SINE), Alu, amplifies through a poorly understood RNA-mediated mechanism, termed retroposition. There are over one million copies of Alu per haploid human genome. The copies show some internal variations in sequence and are very heterogeneous in chromosomal environment. However, very few Alu elements actively(More)
Alu elements undergo amplification through retroposition and integration into new locations throughout primate genomes. Over 500,000 Alu elements reside in the human genome, making the identification of newly inserted Alu repeats the genomic equivalent of finding needles in the haystack. Here, we present two complementary methods for rapid detection of(More)
Long and short interspersed elements (LINEs and SINEs) are retroelements that make up almost half of the human genome. L1 and Alu represent the most prolific human LINE and SINE families, respectively. Only a few Alu elements are able to retropose, and the factors determining their retroposition capacity are poorly understood. The data presented in this(More)