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Human walking is a dynamic, partly self-stabilizing process relying on the interaction of the biomechanical design with its neuronal control. The coordination of this process is a very difficult problem, and it has been suggested that it involves a hierarchy of levels, where the lower ones, e.g., interactions between muscles and the spinal cord, are largely(More)
* Controlling sensori-motor systems in higher animals or complex robots is a challenging combinatorial problem, because many sensory signals need to be simultaneously coordinated into a broad behavioural spectrum. To rapidly interact with the environment, this control needs to be fast and adaptive. Present robotic solutions operate with limited autonomy and(More)
Living creatures, like walking animals, have found fascinating solutions for the problem of locomotion control. Their movements show the impression of elegance including versatile, energy-efficient, and adaptable locomotion. During the last few decades, roboticists have tried to imitate such natural properties with artificial legged locomotion systems by(More)
Neurobiological studies have shown that insects are able to adapt leg movements and posture for obstacle negotiation in changing environments. Moreover, the distance to an obstacle where an insect begins to climb is found to be a major parameter for successful obstacle negotiation. Inspired by these findings, we present an adaptive neural control mechanism(More)
Walking animals, like stick insects, cockroaches or ants, demonstrate a fascinating range of locomotive abilities and complex behaviors. The locomotive behaviors can consist of a variety of walking patterns along with adaptation that allow the animals to deal with changes in environmental conditions, like uneven terrains, gaps, obstacles etc. Biological(More)
In this paper, we investigated the dynamics of a hexapod robot model whose legs are driven by nonlinear oscillators with a phase modulation mechanism including phase resetting and inhibition. This mechanism changes the oscillation period of the oscillator depending solely on the timing of the foot's contact. This strategy is based on observation of animals.(More)
A neurocontroller is described which generates the basic locomotion and controls the sensor-driven behavior of a four-legged and a six-legged walking machine. The controller utilizes discrete-time neuro-dynamics, and is ofmodular structure. One module isfor processing sensor signals, one is a neural oscillator network serving as a central pattern generator,(More)