Poonam Sheth

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Pressurized metered dose inhalers (MDIs) are a long-standing method to treat diseases of the lung, such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. MDIs rely on the driving force of the propellant, which comprises the bulk of the MDI formulation, to atomize droplets containing drug and excipients, which ideally should deposit in the lungs. During(More)
Pressurized metered dose inhalers (MDIs) were first introduced in the 1950s and they are currently widely prescribed as portable systems to treat pulmonary conditions. MDIs consist of a formulation containing dissolved or suspended drug and hardware needed to contain the formulation and enable efficient and consistent dose delivery to the patient. The(More)
This work describes a method that passively assesses basic walker-assisted gait characteristic, including heel strikes, toe-off events, as well as stride time, double support and right & left single support phases using only force-moment measurements from the walker's handles. The passively derived gait characteristics were validated against motion capture(More)
A new model has been developed for predicting size distributions delivered from pressurized metered dose inhalers (pMDIs) that contain suspended drug particles. This model enables the residual particle size distribution to be predicted for a broad range of formulations. It expands on previous models by allowing for polydisperse micronized input drug,(More)
Pressurized metered dose inhalers (pMDIs) are widely used for the treatment of diseases of the lung, including asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The mass median aerodynamic diameter of the residual particles (MMADR) delivered from a pMDI plays a key role in determining the amount and location of drug deposition in the lung and thereby the(More)
BACKGROUND The selection of accessory devices for pressurized metered-dose inhalers (pMDIs) by health care professionals is typically cost driven without consideration of how the device modifies clinical outcomes. OBJECTIVE To evaluate nonconventional accessory devices and the open-mouth technique with and without ideal coordination of actuation and(More)
A simulation model has been established to predict the residual aerodynamic particle size distribution (APSD) of dual-component pressurized metered dose inhalers (pMDIs). More specifically, this model estimates the APSD of pMDI formulations containing dissolved and suspended compounds for various formulations, and has been verified experimentally. Simulated(More)
Metered dose inhalers (MDIs) are complex drug-device combination products widely used to treat pulmonary disorders. The efficacy, driven by aerosol performance of the products, depends on a multitude of factors including, but not limited to, the physicochemical properties of drug and nature and amount of excipient(s). Under the quality by design (QbD)(More)
Pressurized metered dose inhalers (pMDIs) are widely used for the treatment of pulmonary diseases. The overall efficiency of pMDI drug delivery may be defined by in vitro parameters such as the amount of drug that deposits on the model throat and the proportion of the emitted dose that has particles that are sufficiently small to deposit in the lung (i.e.,(More)
Pressurized metered dose inhalers (pMDIs) are frequently used for the treatment of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The aerodynamic particle size distribution (APSD) of the residual particles delivered from a pMDI plays a key role in determining the amount and region of drug deposition in the lung and thereby the efficacy of the inhaler. In(More)