Dave R M Langers12
Emile de Kleine10
12Dave R M Langers
10Emile de Kleine
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Despite numerous neuroimaging studies, the tonotopic organization in human auditory cortex is not yet unambiguously established. In this functional magnetic resonance imaging study, 20 subjects were presented with low-level task-irrelevant tones to avoid spread of cortical activation. Data-driven analyses were employed to obtain robust tonotopic maps. Two(More)
When stimulated by tones, the ear appears to emit tones of its own, stimulus-frequency otoacoustic emissions (SFOAEs). SFOAEs were measured in 17 chinchillas and their group delays were compared with a place map of basilar-membrane vibration group delays measured at the characteristic frequency. The map is based on Wiener-kernel analysis of responses to(More)
Responses to broadband Gaussian white noise were recorded in auditory-nerve fibers of deeply anesthetized chinchillas and analyzed by computation of zeroth-, first-, and second-order Wiener kernels. The first-order kernels (similar to reverse correlations or "revcors") of fibers with characteristic frequency (CF) <2 kHz consisted of lightly damped transient(More)
Functional MRI was performed to investigate differences in the basic functional organization of the primary and secondary auditory cortex regarding preferred stimulus lateralization and frequency. A modified sparse acquisition scheme was used to spatially map the characteristics of the auditory cortex at the level of individual voxels. In the regions of(More)
Although it is known that responses in the auditory cortex are evoked predominantly contralateral to the side of stimulation, the lateralization of responses at lower levels in the human central auditory system has hardly been studied. Furthermore, little is known on the functional interactions between the involved processing centers. In this study,(More)
Tinnitus is an auditory percept in the absence of an external sound source. Mechanisms in the central nervous system are believed to be key in the pathophysiology of tinnitus. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is an MR imaging technique that allows in vivo exploration of white matter tissue in the human brain. Using a probabilistic DTI approach, we determined(More)
Tinnitus is a phantom sound percept that is strongly associated with peripheral hearing loss. However, only a fraction of hearing-impaired subjects develops tinnitus. This may be based on differences in the function of the brain between those subjects that develop tinnitus and those that do not. In this study, cortical and sub-cortical sound-evoked brain(More)
Spontaneous otoacoustic emissions (SOAEs) are generated by self-sustained cochlear oscillators. Properties of a computational model for a linear array of active oscillators with nearest neighbor coupling are investigated. The model can produce many experimentally well-established properties of SOAEs.
The anuran ear is frequently used for studying fundamental properties of vertebrate auditory systems. This is due to its unique anatomical features, most prominently the lack of a basilar membrane and the presence of two dedicated acoustic end organs, the basilar papilla and the amphibian papilla. Our current anatomical and functional knowledge implies that(More)
Human visual cortex contains maps of the visual field. Much research has been dedicated to answering whether and when these visual field maps change if critical components of the visual circuitry are damaged. Here, we first provide a focused mini-review of the functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies that have evaluated the human cortical visual(More)