Pierrick Bourgeat

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The Australian Imaging, Biomarkers and Lifestyle (AIBL) study of aging, a participant of the worldwide Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI), performed (11)C-Pittsburgh Compound B (PiB) scans in 177 healthy controls (HC), 57 mild cognitive impairment (MCI) subjects, and 53 mild Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. High PiB binding was present in(More)
BACKGROUND Similar to most chronic diseases, Alzheimer's disease (AD) develops slowly from a preclinical phase into a fully expressed clinical syndrome. We aimed to use longitudinal data to calculate the rates of amyloid β (Aβ) deposition, cerebral atrophy, and cognitive decline. METHODS In this prospective cohort study, healthy controls, patients with(More)
OBJECTIVE Assess Aβ deposition longitudinally and explore its relationship with cognition and disease progression. METHODS Clinical follow-up was obtained 20 ± 3 months after [¹¹C]Pittsburgh compound B (PiB)-positron emission tomography in 206 subjects: 35 with dementia of the Alzheimer type (DAT), 65 with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and 106(More)
OBJECTIVE Elucidating the role of aggregated beta-amyloid in relation to gray matter atrophy is crucial to the understanding of the pathological mechanisms of Alzheimer disease and for the development of therapeutic trials. The present study aims to assess this relationship. METHODS Brain magnetic resonance imaging and [(11)C]Pittsburgh compound B(More)
OBJECTIVE To investigate whether global and regional beta-amyloid (Abeta) burden as measured with 11C Pittsburgh compound B (PIB) PET is associated with hippocampal atrophy characterized using MRI in healthy controls and patients with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) or Alzheimer disease (AD). METHODS Ninety-two elderly healthy controls, 32(More)
Amyloid-β deposition in Alzheimer's disease is thought to start while individuals are still cognitively unimpaired and it is hypothesized that after an early phase of fast accumulation, a plateau is reached by the time of cognitive decline. However, few longitudinal Pittsburgh compound B-positron emission tomography studies have tested this hypothesis, and(More)
The earliest detectable change in Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the buildup of amyloid plaque in the brain. Early detection of AD, prior to irreversible neurological damage, is important for the efficacy of current interventions as well as for the development of new treatments. Although PiB-PET imaging and CSF amyloid are the gold standards for early AD(More)
β-Amyloid deposition is one of the main hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease thought to eventually cause neuronal death. Post-mortem and neuroimaging studies have consistently reported cases with documented normal cognition despite high β-amyloid burden. It is of great interest to understand what differentiates these particular subjects from those without(More)
Accurate cortical thickness estimation is important for the study of many neurodegenerative diseases. Many approaches have been previously proposed, which can be broadly categorised as mesh-based and voxel-based. While the mesh-based approaches can potentially achieve subvoxel resolution, they usually lack the computational efficiency needed for clinical(More)
Identifying mild cognitive impairment (MCI) subjects who will convert to clinical Alzheimer's disease (AD) is important for therapeutic decisions, patient counselling and clinical trials. Hippocampal volume and rate of atrophy predict clinical decline at the MCI stage and progression to AD. In this paper, we create p-maps from the differences in the shape(More)