Philip Mirowski

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The early 1980s constituted a watershed in science, mainly concerning the extent and nature of globalization and commercialization of scientific research, and its impact upon the university. Considerable debate has arisen about the sources of this transition, but aside from a few lone voices, the scholarly literature has neglected the concurrent rise of the(More)
It is not a fate that you would not wish upon anyone: to be feted and celebrated during their lifetime as author of one of the 100 most important books of the twentieth century, and yet close on the heels of their demise, become rapidly subjected to a bout of reconsideration and rejection that borders on the vindictive, with the unabashed aim of relegating(More)
point precision at the Dartmouth summer conference of 1956; and then an upward trend, punctuated by periodic bouts of soul searching. The frame tale provided therein was basically that AI was “an idea that has pervaded Western intellectual history, a dream in urgent need of being realized” (p. xii) and that this innate primal urge to build little simulacra(More)
* Dept. of Economics and Policy Studies, 400 Decio Hall, University of Notre Dame, and Visiting Scholar, International Center for Advanced Studies, New York University. Please direct all correspondence to Mirowski.1@nd.edu. I should like to thank the audiences at CarnegieMellon, University of Stirling and the Universidad Republica de Montevideo, Uruguay,(More)
It is said that there are 100,000 words in the English language, and before I read Philip Mirowski’s Machine Dreams (MD) I thought I knew 90,000 of them. Now, following this encounter, I feel that, at last, I have control of the whole English vocabulary! I start with this joke because it exemplifies in many ways the nature of this book. The way Mirowski(More)
This HOPE minisymposium has been prompted by a question I have been asking friends in anthropology for some time now, namely, where are the writers who are revisiting and rethinking the history of economic anthropology? Lest one wonders if this question asks for something that no one wants, or else is hopelessly naive, let me quickly add that, in stark(More)