Philip J. Vergragt

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Large-scale shifts in dominant technologies are the necessary components of a transition toward sustainability. Such shifts are difficult because, in addition to technological innovation, they require changes in the existing institutions, professional norms, belief systems and, in some cases, also lifestyles. In the languages of cognitive and policy(More)
7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 Article history: Received 27 February 2011 Accepted 9 March 2011 Available online xxxx 15 16 17 18 19 In this introductory paper we introduce the special issue on “Backcasting for Sustainability”. We present briefly a historical background, and position backcasting in the wider context of future studies, in which it can be related to(More)
In the automotive industry the Fuel Cell Vehicle (FCV) is increasingly seen as the sustainable alternative to internal combustion engine (ICE)-based vehicles. The growing popularity of FC technology in the automotive industry provides an interesting case. Where one would expect the mature automotive industry to dismiss FC technology in order not to(More)
In the Dutch National Environmental Policy Plan 4 it has been recognised that persistent environmental problems (such as global warming caused by greenhouse gases) cannot be solved by traditional policy instruments or by technological innovation alone. Transitions are necessary and have been defined as long-term, continuous processes in which a society or a(More)
Genetically modified crops and foodstuff have been highly controversial for environmental, health, and ethical reasons. The controversies have been worldwide, but most prominent in the European Union, for reasons that include distrust of the regulatory authorities, scientists and technocratic decision making. An informal moratorium in the EU came recently(More)
With a growing world population and increasing global economic wealth, radical changes to our production and consumption patterns are required to achieve sustainable development. Some claim that we have to improve our environmental efficiency by a Factor 4, which would enable the world to double its wealth while halving its environmental burden. Others(More)
Article history: Received 27 February 2011 Accepted 9 March 2011 Available online 3 April 2011 In this introductory paper we introduce the special issue on “Backcasting for Sustainability”. We present briefly a historical background, and position backcasting in the wider context of future studies, in which it can be related to “normative forecasting” and(More)
Meeting the needs of present generations while ensuring that future generations can fulfil their needs properly requires sustainable development. Assuming that in the next 50 years the global population will double and global wealth will increase fivefold, while it will be necessary to halve the environmental burden, social needs will have to be fulfilled(More)
Introduction The use of war metaphors has increased over the past few years in discussions about climate change. Particularly notable is a doubling between 2006 and 2007 in the number of English-language news articles mentioning the war on/against climate change. Also relevant in this regard was the move in 2008 by industrialist Richard Branson to establish(More)