Peter P Nawroth

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Amyloid-beta peptide (Abeta) interacts with the vasculature to influence Abeta levels in the brain and cerebral blood flow, providing a means of amplifying the Abeta-induced cellular stress underlying neuronal dysfunction and dementia. Systemic Abeta infusion and studies in genetically manipulated mice show that Abeta interaction with receptor for advanced(More)
S100/calgranulin polypeptides are present at sites of inflammation, likely released by inflammatory cells targeted to such loci by a range of environmental cues. We report here that receptor for AGE (RAGE) is a central cell surface receptor for EN-RAGE (extracellular newly identified RAGE-binding protein) and related members of the S100/calgranulin(More)
Advanced glycation end products (AGEs), S100/calgranulins, HMGB1-proteins, amyloid-β peptides, and the family of β-sheet fibrils have been shown to contribute to a number of chronic diseases such as diabetes, amyloidoses, inflammatory conditions, and tumors by promoting cellular dysfunction via binding to cellular surface receptors. The receptor for AGEs(More)
Three of the major biochemical pathways implicated in the pathogenesis of hyperglycemia induced vascular damage (the hexosamine pathway, the advanced glycation end product (AGE) formation pathway and the diacylglycerol (DAG)-protein kinase C (PKC) pathway) are activated by increased availability of the glycolytic metabolites glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate and(More)
Little is known about the mechanisms converting psychosocial stress into cellular dysfunction. Various genes, up-regulated in atherosclerosis but also by psychosocial stress, are controlled by the transcription factor nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB). Therefore, NF-kappaB is a good candidate to convert psychosocial stress into cellular activation.(More)
In ischemic stroke, the necrotic core is surrounded by a zone of inflammation, in which delayed cell death aggravates the initial insult. Here, we provide evidence that the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) functions as a sensor of necrotic cell death and contributes to inflammation and ischemic brain damage. The RAGE ligand high mobility(More)
The pattern recognition receptor, RAGE (receptor for advanced glycation endproducts), propagates cellular dysfunction in several inflammatory disorders and diabetes. Here we show that RAGE functions as an endothelial adhesion receptor promoting leukocyte recruitment. In an animal model of thioglycollate-induced acute peritonitis, leukocyte recruitment was(More)
BACKGROUND High-mobility group box-1 (HMGB1) is a nuclear factor released by necrotic cells and by activated immune cells. HMGB1 signals via members of the toll-like receptor family and the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE). Although HMGB1 has been implicated in ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury of the liver and lung, its role in I/R(More)
Damaged mitochondria generate an excess of superoxide, which may mediate tissue injury in diabetes. We hypothesized that in diabetic nephropathy, advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) lead to increases in cytosolic reactive oxygen species (ROS), which facilitate the production of mitochondrial superoxide. In normoglycemic conditions, exposure of primary(More)
Diabetic nephropathy ensues from events involving earliest changes in the glomeruli and podocytes, followed by accumulation of extracellular matrix in the mesangium. Postulated mechanisms include roles for vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), produced by podocytes and contributing to enhanced excretion of urinary albumin and recruitment/activation of(More)