Peter J. Teuben

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tration (NASA) has been established to serve the space science communities in evolving cost effective, interoperable data systems. The NOST performs a number of functions designed to facilitate the recognition, development, adoption, and use of standards by the space science communities. Approval of a NOST standard requires verification by the NOST that the(More)
The Astrophysics Source Code Library (ASCL, http://ascl.net/) is an on-line registry of over 700 source codes that are of interest to astrophysicists, with more being added regularly. The ASCL actively seeks out codes as well as accepting submissions from the code authors, and all entries are citable and indexed by ADS. All codes have been used to generate(More)
While software and algorithms have become increasingly important in astronomy, the majority of authors who publish computational astronomy research do not share the source code they develop, making it difficult to replicate and reuse the work. In this paper we discuss the importance of sharing scientific source code with the entire astrophysics community,(More)
1 Summary Astronomical software is now a fact of daily life for all hands-on members of the astronomy and astrophysics community. Purpose-built software to assist in and automate data reduction and modeling tasks becomes ever more critical as we handle larger amounts of data and simulations and doing steps " by hand " becomes less practical. However, the(More)
Progress is being made in code discoverability and preservation, but as discussed at ADASS XXI, many codes still remain hidden from public view. With the Astrophysics Source Code Library (ASCL) 1 now indexed by the SAO/NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS), the introduction of a new journal, Astronomy & Computing, fo-cused on astrophysics software, and the(More)
The Astrophysics Source Code Library (ASCL), founded in 1999, is a free on-line registry for source codes of interest to astronomers and astrophysicists. The library is housed on the discussion forum for Astronomy Picture of the Day (APOD) and can be accessed at http://ascl.net. The ASCL has a comprehensive listing that covers a significant number of the(More)
The Astrophysics Source Code Library (ASCL) 1 is a free online registry of codes used in astronomy research; it currently contains over 900 codes and is indexed by ADS. The ASCL has recently moved a new infrastructure into production. The new site provides a true database for the code entries and integrates the WordPress news and information pages and the(More)
How do we as a community encourage the reuse of software for telescope operations , data processing, and calibration? How can we support making codes used in research available for others to examine? Continuing the discussion from last year Bring out your codes! BoF session, participants separated into groups to brainstorm ideas to mitigate factors which(More)
Improving software citation and credit continues to be a topic of interest across and within many disciplines, with numerous efforts underway. In this Birds of a Feather (BoF) session, we started with a list of actionable ideas from last year's BoF and other similar efforts and worked alone or in small groups to begin implementing them. Work was captured in(More)
The past year has seen movement on several fronts for improving software citation , including the Center for Open Science's Transparency and Openness Promotion (TOP) Guidelines, the Software Publishing Special Interest Group that was started at January's AAS meeting in Seattle at the request of that organization's Working Group on Astronomical Software, a(More)