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Lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) is the prototypical psychedelic drug, but its effects on the human brain have never been studied before with modern neuroimaging. Here, three complementary neuroimaging techniques: arterial spin labeling (ASL), blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) measures, and magnetoencephalography (MEG), implemented during resting state(More)
Entropy is a dimensionless quantity that is used for measuring uncertainty about the state of a system but it can also imply physical qualities, where high entropy is synonymous with high disorder. Entropy is applied here in the context of states of consciousness and their associated neurodynamics, with a particular focus on the psychedelic state. The(More)
Understanding how dynamic changes in brain activity control behavior is a major challenge of cognitive neuroscience. Here, we consider the brain as a complex dynamic system and define two measures of brain dynamics: the synchrony of brain activity, measured by the spatial coherence of the BOLD signal across regions of the brain; and metastability, which we(More)
OBJECTIVE Traumatic brain injury (TBI) often results in traumatic axonal injury (TAI). This can be difficult to identify using conventional imaging. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) offers a method of assessing axonal damage in vivo, but has previously mainly been used to investigate groups of patients. Machine learning techniques are increasingly used to(More)
Networks, as efficient representations of complex systems, have appealed to scientists for a long time and now permeate many areas of science, including neuroimaging (Bullmore and Sporns 2009 Nat. Rev. Neurosci. 10, 186-198. (doi:10.1038/nrn2618)). Traditionally, the structure of complex networks has been studied through their statistical properties and(More)
At the forefront of neuroimaging is the understanding of the functional architecture of the human brain. In most applications functional networks are assumed to be stationary, resulting in a single network estimated for the entire time course. However recent results suggest that the connectivity between brain regions is highly non-stationary even at rest.(More)
Sensory input evokes low-order reflexes and higher-order perceptual responses. Vestibular stimulation elicits vestibular-ocular reflex (VOR) and self-motion perception (e.g., vertigo) whose response durations are normally equal. Adaptation to repeated whole-body rotations, for example, ballet training, is known to reduce vestibular responses. We(More)
Self-awareness is commonly impaired after traumatic brain injury. This is an important clinical issue as awareness affects long-term outcome and limits attempts at rehabilitation. It can be investigated by studying how patients respond to their errors and monitor their performance on tasks. As awareness is thought to be an emergent property of network(More)
Traumatic brain injury affects brain connectivity by producing traumatic axonal injury. This disrupts the function of large-scale networks that support cognition. The best way to describe this relationship is unclear, but one elegant approach is to view networks as graphs. Brain regions become nodes in the graph, and white matter tracts the connections. The(More)
At the macroscopic scale, the human brain can be described as a complex network of white matter tracts integrating grey matter assemblies - the human connectome. The structure of the connectome, which is often described using graph theoretic approaches, can be used to model macroscopic brain function at low computational cost. Here, we use the Kuramoto(More)