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This paper uses the latest data from the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) to compare the health systems of the thirty member countries in 2000. Total health spending--the distribution of public and private health spending in the OECD countries--is presented and discussed. U.S. public spending as a percentage of GDP (5.8 percent)(More)
BACKGROUND Broad-based collaborations are becoming increasingly common among disease researchers. For example, the Global HIV Enterprise has united cross-disciplinary consortia to speed progress towards HIV vaccines through coordinated research across the boundaries of institutions, continents and specialties. New, end-to-end software tools for data and(More)
U.S. citizens spent $5,267 per capita for health care in 2002--53 percent more than any other country. Two possible reasons for the differential are supply constraints that create waiting lists in other countries and the level of malpractice litigation and defensive medicine in the United States. Services that typically have queues in other countries(More)
This product is part of the RAND Health working paper series. RAND working papers are intended to share researchers' latest findings and to solicit informal peer review. They have been approved for circulation by RAND Health but have not been formally edited or peer reviewed. Unless otherwise indicated, working papers can be quoted and cited without(More)
This article describes research related to the design of a payment model for specialty oncology services for possible testing by the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation at the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS). Cancer is a common and costly condition. Episode-based payment, which aims to create incentives for high-quality, low-cost(More)
This series is designed to make available to a wider readership methodological studies and statistical analysis presenting and interpreting new data sources, and empirical results and developments in methodology on measuring and assessing health care and health expenditure. The papers are generally available only in their original language – English or(More)
In 2003 citizens of Canada, the United Kingdom, and France paid an average of 34-59 percent of what Americans paid for a similar market basket of pharmaceuticals. If the Medicare program were to pay comparable prices for pharmaceuticals, it would be possible to eliminate the "doughnut hole" in its prescription drug benefit and keep Medicare drug spending(More)
BACKGROUND Improving care coordination is a national priority and a key focus of health care reforms. However, its measurement and ultimate achievement is challenging. OBJECTIVE To test whether patients whose providers frequently share patients with one another-what we term 'care density'-tend to have lower costs of care and likelihood of hospitalization.(More)
This article reviews methodologies and international experience related to costing and pricing health services for health care purchasers. The main factors affecting price-setting methods are: (1) provider payment systems; (2) information available on actual costs, service volumes and outcomes; and (3) characteristics of providers and purchasers. These(More)