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  • Donggyun Shin, Kyung Hee, Gary Solon, Tom Deleire, Doug Elmendorf, Mike Elsby +4 others
  • 2008
Using Panel Study of Income Dynamics data for 1969 through 2004, we examine movements in men's earnings volatility. Like many previous studies, we find that earnings volatility is substantially countercyclical. As for secular trends, we find that men's earnings volatility increased during the 1970s, but did not show a clear trend afterwards until a new(More)
This paper explores the claim that college-educated workers are increasingly likely to be in " non-college " occupations. We provide a conceptual framework that gives analytical content to the previously vague distinction between college and non-college jobs. This framework is used to show that skill-biased technological change will lead to a decline in the(More)
  • Alessandro Barattieri, Susanto Basu, Peter Gottschalk, Mark Bils, Mattgeo Iacoviello, Peter Klenow +4 others
  • 2010
Nominal wage stickiness is an important component of recent medium-scale macroeconomic models, but to date there has been little microeconomic evidence supporting the assumption of sluggish nominal wage adjustment. We present evidence on the frequency of nominal wage adjustment using data from the Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP) for the(More)
  • Rolf Aaberge, Anders Björklund, Markus Jäntti, Mårten Palme, Peder J Pedersen, Nina Smith +4 others
  • 2002
This paper compares income inequality and income mobility in the Scandinavian countries and the United States during 1980-90. The results suggest that inequality is greater in the United States than in the Scandinavian countries and that this inequality ranking of countries remains unchanged when the accounting period of income is extended from one to(More)
  • Harry J Holzer, Paul Offner, Elaine Sorensen, Julie Fritts, Kate Pomper, Melissa Powell +4 others
  • 2004
In this paper, we document the continuing decline in employment and labor force participation of black men between the ages of 16 and 34 who have a high school education or less. We explore the extent to which these trends can be accounted for in recent years by two fairly new developments: (1) The dramatic growth in the number of young black men who have(More)