Peter G. Schulam

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A fully implantable wireless pressure sensor system was developed to monitor bladder pressures in vivo. The system comprises a small commercial pressure die connected via catheter to amplifying electronics, a microcontroller, wireless transmitter, battery, and a personal digital assistant (PDA) or computer to receive the wireless data. The sensor is fully(More)
Transurethral ultrasound (TUUS) may improve prostate imaging by providing real-time volumetric imagery from directly within the prostate. A transurethral ultrasound transducer prototype was developed that features a cylindrical 2D array of piezoelectric elements that can be integrated with a catheter body. Fabrication of the transducer was made possible(More)
Direct measurements of arterial blood pressure most commonly use bulky external instrumentation containing a pressure transducer connected to an ex vivo fluid-filled arterial line, which is subject to several sensing artifacts. In situ blood pressure sensors, typically solid state piezoresistive, capacitive, and interferometric sensors, are unaffected by(More)
A wireless implantable pressure sensing system has been developed for short term urological studies. In in vitro testing, it was able to sense a physiologically relevant pressure range (0-1.5 psi gauge) with a resolution of 0.02 psi. In vivo testing demonstrated its ability to operate for >90 hours while implanted in a porcine model. Possible urination(More)
Current methods of prostate cancer diagnosis and therapy rely on accurate imaging of the prostate using real-time ultrasound. Transurethral ultrasound (TUUS) may improve upon the current gold standard through improved 3D visualization and co-registration (fusion) with CT and MRI. A prototype transurethral ultrasound (TUUS) catheter-based transducer array(More)
Direct measurements of arterial blood pressure most commonly use bulky external instrumentation containing a pressure transducer connected to an ex vivo fluid-filled arterial line, which is subject to several sensing artifacts. In situ blood pressure sensors, typically solid state piezoresistive, capacitive, and interferometric sensors, are unaffected by(More)
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