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Audience effects on moralistic punishment
Abstract Punishment has been proposed as being central to two distinctively human phenomena: cooperation in groups and morality. Here we investigate moralistic punishment, a behavior designed toExpand
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The omission effect in moral cognition: toward a functional explanation
Moral judgment involves much more than computations of the expected consequences of behavior. A prime example of the complexity of moral thinking is the frequently replicated finding that violationsExpand
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Hamilton vs. Kant: pitting adaptations for altruism against adaptations for moral judgment
Prominent evolutionary theories of morality maintain that the adaptations that underlie moral judgment and behavior function, at least in part, to deliver benefits (or prevent harm) to others. TheseExpand
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Reciprocity in groups : Information-seeking in a public goods game
Questions remain about the details of the reciprocal strategies people use in the context of group cooperation. Here we report an experiment in which participants in public goods games could accessExpand
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Best Friends
Like many topics of psychological research, the explanation for friendship is at once intuitive and difficult to address empirically. These difficulties worsen when one seeks, as we do, to go beyondExpand
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Audience effects on moralistic punishment B
Punishment has been proposed as being central to two distinctively human phenomena: cooperation in groups and morality. Here we investigate moralistic punishment, a behavior designed to inflict costsExpand
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Adaptationist punishment in humans
Immanuel Kant, Adam Smith, Charles Darwin, George Williams, and Stephen J. Gould, among others, have pointed out that observing that a certain behavior causes a certain effect does not itself licenseExpand
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Intuitive Political Theory: People's Judgments About How Groups Should Decide
Societies must make collective decisions even when citizens disagree, and they use many different political processes to do so. But how do people choose one way to make a group decision over another?Expand
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Selfish and Cooperative Voting: Can the Majority Restrain Themselves?
At every scale from small committees to national elections, voters face tradeoffs between self-interest and the common good. We report three experiments in which participants vote for policies withExpand
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