Peter David Currie

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Despite the pre-eminence of the mouse in modelling human disease, several aspects of murine biology limit its routine use in large-scale genetic and therapeutic screening. Many researchers who are interested in an embryologically and genetically tractable disease model have now turned to zebrafish. Zebrafish biology allows ready access to all developmental(More)
The patterning of vertebrate somitic muscle is regulated by signals from neighboring tissues. We examined the generation of slow and fast muscle in zebrafish embryos and show that Sonic hedgehog (Shh) secreted from the notochord can induce slow muscle from medial cells of the somite. Slow muscle derives from medial adaxial myoblasts that differentiate(More)
The notochord plays a central role in vertebrate development, acting as a signalling source that patterns the neural tube and somites. In in vitro assays, the secreted protein Sonic hedgehog mimics the inducing effects of notochord on both presomitic mesoderm and neural plate explants of amniote embryos, suggesting that both patterning activities of the(More)
Somites are transient, mesodermally derived structures that give rise to a number of different cell types within the vertebrate embryo. To achieve this, somitic cells are partitioned into lineage-restricted domains, whose fates are determined by signals secreted from adjacent tissues. While the molecular nature of many of the inductive signals that trigger(More)
The specification of different muscle cell types in the zebrafish embryo requires signals that emanate from the axial mesoderm. In previous studies we and others have shown that overexpression of different members of the Hedgehog protein family can induce the differentiation of two types of slow-twitch muscles, the superficially located slow-twitch fibres(More)
The evolution of terrestrial tetrapod species heralded a transition in locomotor strategies. While most fish species use the undulating contractions of the axial musculature to generate propulsive force, tetrapods also rely on the appendicular muscles of the limbs to generate movement. Despite the fossil record generating an understanding of the way in(More)
Adult zebrafish show a remarkable capacity to regenerate their spinal column after injury, an ability that stands in stark contrast to the limited repair that occurs within the mammalian CNS post-injury. The reasons for this interspecies difference in regenerative capacity remain unclear. Here we demonstrate a novel role for Fgf signaling during glial cell(More)
Mutations in the human laminin alpha2 (LAMA2) gene result in the most common form of congenital muscular dystrophy (MDC1A). There are currently three models for the molecular basis of cellular pathology in MDC1A: (i) lack of LAMA2 leads to sarcolemmal weakness and failure, followed by cellular necrosis, as is the case in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD);(More)
A class of recessive lethal zebrafish mutations has been identified in which normal skeletal muscle differentiation is followed by a tissue-specific degeneration that is reminiscent of the human muscular dystrophies. Here, we show that one of these mutations, sapje, disrupts the zebrafish orthologue of the X-linked human Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD)(More)
The molecular, genetic and cellular bases for skeletal muscle growth and regeneration have been recently documented in a number of vertebrate species. These studies highlight the role of transient subcompartments of the early somite as a source of distinct waves of myogenic precursors. Individual myogenic progenitor populations undergo a complex series of(More)