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Recent cerebral blood flow (CBF) and glucose consumption (CMRglc) studies of Parkinson's disease (PD) revealed conflicting results. Using simulated data, we previously demonstrated that the often-reported subcortical hypermetabolism in PD could be explained as an artifact of biased global mean (GM) normalization, and that low-magnitude, extensive cortical(More)
Cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen consumption (CMRO(2)), cerebral blood flow (CBF), and oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) are important indices of healthy aging of the brain. Although a frequent topic of study, changes of CBF and CMRO(2) during normal aging are still controversial, as some authors find decreases of both CBF and CMRO(2) but increased OEF,(More)
Post-mortem and neuroimaging studies suggest that the serotonergic system, which originates from the brainstem raphe nuclei, is disrupted in Parkinson's disease. This could contribute to the occurrence of non-motor symptoms and tremor, which are only partially explained by dopamine loss. However, the level of involvement of the serotonergic raphe nuclei in(More)
INTRODUCTION In positron emission tomography (PET) studies of cerebral blood flow (CBF) and metabolism, the large interindividual variation commonly is minimized by normalization to the global mean prior to statistical analysis. This approach requires that no between-group or between-state differences exist in the normalization region. Given the variability(More)
BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Previous volumetric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies of Parkinson's disease (PD) utilized primarily voxel-based morphometry (VBM), and investigated mostly patients with moderate- to late-stage disease. We now use deformation-based morphometry (DBM), a method purported to be more sensitive than VBM, to test for atrophy in(More)
Conventional indices of the utilization of FDOPA in living human brain have not consistently revealed important declines in dopamine function with normal aging. However, most methods of kinetic analysis have assumed irreversible trapping of decarboxylated FDOPA metabolites in brain, an assumption that is violated even in PET recordings of short duration.(More)
AIM Recent studies of Parkinson's disease (PD) report subcortical increases of cerebral blood flow (CBF) or cerebral metabolic rate of glucose (CMRglc), after conventional normalization to the global mean. However, if the global mean CBF or CMRglc is decreased in the PD group, this normalization necessarily generates artificial relative increases in regions(More)
Hyperoxic therapy for cerebral ischemia is suspected to reduce cerebral blood flow (CBF), due to the vasoconstrictive effect of oxygen on cerebral arterioles. We hypothesized that vasodilation predominates when 5% CO(2) is added to the inhaled oxygen (carbogen). Therefore, we used positron emission tomography (PET) to measure CBF and cerebral metabolic rate(More)
In a recent issue of NeuroImage, we presented evidence that biased global mean (GM) normalization of brain PET data can generate the appearance of subcortical foci with relative hypermetabolism in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), and other degenerative disorders. In a commentary to our article, Ma and colleagues presented a study seeking to establish(More)
OBJECTIVES Evidence from experimental animal models of Parkinson's disease (PD) suggests a characteristic pattern of metabolic perturbation in discrete, very small basal ganglia structures. These structures are generally too small to allow valid investigation by conventional positron emission tomography (PET) cameras. However, the high-resolution research(More)