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Neurotransmitter release is achieved through the fusion of synaptic vesicles with the neuronal plasma membrane (exocytosis). Vesicles are then retrieved from the plasma membrane (endocytosis). It was hypothesized more than 3 decades ago that endosomes participate in vesicle recycling, constituting a slow endocytosis pathway required especially after(More)
Synaptic vesicles recycle repeatedly in order to maintain synaptic transmission. We have previously proposed that upon exocytosis the vesicle components persist as clusters, which would be endocytosed as whole units. It has also been proposed that the vesicle components diffuse into the plasma membrane and are then randomly gathered into new vesicles. We(More)
The synaptic vesicle is the essential organelle of the synapse. Many approaches for studying synaptic vesicle recycling have been devised, one of which, the styryl (FM) dye, is well suited for this purpose. FM dyes reversibly stain, but do not permeate, membranes; hence they can specifically label membrane-bound organelles. Their quantum yield is(More)
The synaptic vesicle is the essential organelle of the synapse. Many approaches for studying synaptic vesicle recycling have been devised, one of which, the styryl (FM) dye, is well suited for this purpose. The FM dyes have a unique set of properties that allows them to selectively label recycling vesicles: They reversibly stain, but do not permeate,(More)
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