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This study compared the early cognitive and linguistic development of young children with cleft palate (N = 28) to that of noncleft children (N = 29). Measures included the Mental scale of the Bayley Scales of Infant Development, the Minnesota Child Development Inventory, Mean Length of Utterance, and words acquired by 24 months. Children with cleft palate,(More)
Aggressive otologic management has been recommended for children with cleft palate because of the almost universal occurrence of otitis media with effusion (OME) in these children and the association of OME with hearing loss and possible language, cognitive, and academic delays. In this study, 28 children with cleft palate and 29 noncleft children were seen(More)
This investigation is a follow-up to a longitudinal speech and educational outcome study involving approximately 400 normally developing children that was initiated in 1960. From this database, two groups of subjects (now aged 32-34), their spouses, and all of their offspring over the age of 3:0 (years:months) completed a battery of cognitive-linguistic and(More)
The present investigation is a follow-up to a longitudinal study involving approximately 400 normally developing children begun in 1960. From this large database, two groups of subjects (now aged 32-34) were asked to participate in the present project: (a) a group of 24 adults with a documented history of a moderate phonological/language disorder that(More)
Word-initial target phonemes and the production of those phonemes were examined in normal children and children with cleft palate during the period when the children were acquiring their first 50 words. As a group, the children with cleft palate tended to target more words with word-initial nasals, approximants, and vowels ([ +sonorant] phonemes) and fewer(More)
The effectiveness of parents as teachers of speech production skills was assessed by comparing changes in the phonological skills of their children, made during a period with no intervention, to changes that occurred when parents served as teachers, and by comparing those changes with changes that occurred in a contrast group who received no intervention.(More)
The present investigation is a follow-up to a longitudinal speech and academic study involving approximately 400 normally developing children begun in 1960 by Mildred Templin. From this large data base, the present project invited the participation of two groups of subjects (now aged 32 to 34): (a) 24 adults with a documented history of moderately severe(More)
Disagreement exists concerning the relationship between the perception of phonetic contrasts and their production by both normal and articulation-delayed children. The perception of three approximant consonant contrasts (/w/-/r/, /w/-/l/, /r/-/l/) was examined in two groups of 3-year-old children: normal children who did and did not articulate /r/ and /l/(More)
The number of capillary blood eosinophils and the prevalence of bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR) were compared between schoolchildren living in a polluted area (Ardal) and unpolluted area (Laerdal). In Ardal there is an aluminium smelter emitting sulphur dioxide and fluoride to the environment. Daily measurements of these pollutants in ambient air were(More)