Pauline Crystal Ng

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The effect of genetic mutation on phenotype is of significant interest in genetics. The type of genetic mutation that causes a single amino acid substitution (AAS) in a protein sequence is called a non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphism (nsSNP). An nsSNP could potentially affect the function of the protein, subsequently altering the carrier's(More)
Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) studies and random mutagenesis projects identify amino acid substitutions in protein-coding regions. Each substitution has the potential to affect protein function. SIFT (Sorting Intolerant From Tolerant) is a program that predicts whether an amino acid substitution affects protein function so that users can prioritize(More)
Many missense substitutions are identified in single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data and large-scale random mutagenesis projects. Each amino acid substitution potentially affects protein function. We have constructed a tool that uses sequence homology to predict whether a substitution affects protein function. SIFT, which sorts intolerant from tolerant(More)
Presented here is a genome sequence of an individual human. It was produced from approximately 32 million random DNA fragments, sequenced by Sanger dideoxy technology and assembled into 4,528 scaffolds, comprising 2,810 million bases (Mb) of contiguous sequence with approximately 7.5-fold coverage for any given region. We developed a modified version of the(More)
A major interest in human genetics is to determine whether a nonsynonymous single-base nucleotide polymorphism (nsSNP) in a gene affects its protein product and, consequently, impacts the carrier's health. We used the SIFT (Sorting Intolerant From Tolerant) program to predict that 25% of 3084 nsSNPs from dbSNP, a public SNP database, would affect protein(More)
Nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) are coding variants that introduce amino acid changes in their corresponding proteins. Because nsSNPs can affect protein function, they are believed to have the largest impact on human health compared with SNPs in other regions of the genome. Therefore, it is important to distinguish those nsSNPs that(More)
The Sorting Intolerant from Tolerant (SIFT) algorithm predicts the effect of coding variants on protein function. It was first introduced in 2001, with a corresponding website that provides users with predictions on their variants. Since its release, SIFT has become one of the standard tools for characterizing missense variation. We have updated SIFT's(More)
Next generation sequencing (NGS) platforms are currently being utilized for targeted sequencing of candidate genes or genomic intervals to perform sequence-based association studies. To evaluate these platforms for this application, we analyzed human sequence generated by the Roche 454, Illumina GA, and the ABI SOLiD technologies for the same 260 kb in four(More)
There is much interest in characterizing the variation in a human individual, because this may elucidate what contributes significantly to a person's phenotype, thereby enabling personalized genomics. We focus here on the variants in a person's 'exome,' which is the set of exons in a genome, because the exome is believed to harbor much of the functional(More)
MOTIVATION Database searching algorithms for proteins use scoring matrices based on average protein properties, and thus are dominated by globular proteins. However, since transmembrane regions of a protein are in a distinctly different environment than globular proteins, one would expect generalized substitution matrices to be inappropriate for(More)