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[1] A long-standing question in geodynamics is the cause of deviations of ocean depth or seafloor topography from the prediction of a cooling half-space model (HSC). Are the deviations caused entirely by mantle plumes or lithospheric reheating associated with sublithospheric small-scale convection or some other mechanisms? In this study we analyzed the age(More)
The article by Wessel et al. [this issue] highlights the need for a systematic mapping of the seamounts in the ocean basins. They estimate that 100,000 or 90% of the seamounts greater than 1 km tall are unobserved by either ship soundings or satellite gravity. There are two reasons why most of these relatively large predicted seamounts remain uncharted.(More)
Wessel et al. (2010) highlight the need for a systematic mapping of seamounts in ocean basins. They estimate that 100,000 or 90% of the seamounts greater than 1-km tall are unobserved by either ship soundings or satellite gravity. There are two reasons why most of these relatively large, predicted seamounts remain uncharted. First, satellite-derived gravity(More)
Seafloor roughness varies considerably across the world's ocean basins and is fundamental to controlling the circulation and mixing of heat in the ocean and dissipating eddy kinetic energy. Models derived from analyses of active mid-ocean ridges suggest that ocean floor roughness depends on seafloor spreading rates, with rougher basement forming below a(More)