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PROBLEM/CONDITION Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), commonly known as Lou Gehrig's disease, is a progressive and fatal neuromuscular disease for which no cure has been identified. Although ALS has no known definitive cause, familial ALS (a hereditary form) occurs in 5%-10% of cases. Many hypotheses have been formulated about what causes ALS, including(More)
Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), commonly known as Lou Gehrig's disease, is a rapidly progressive fatal neurologic disease. Currently, there is no cure for ALS and the available treatments only extend life by an average of a few months. The majority of ALS patients die within 2-5 years of diagnosis, though survival time varies depending on disease(More)
BACKGROUND Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal motor neuron disease that typically results in death within 2-5 years of initial symptom onset. Multidisciplinary ALS clinics (MDCs) have been established to provide specialty care to people living with the disease. OBJECTIVE To estimate the proximity of ALS prevalence cases to the nearest MDC in(More)
PROBLEM/CONDITION Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), commonly known as Lou Gehrig's disease, is a progressive and fatal neuromuscular disease for which no cure or viable treatment has been identified. ALS, like most noncommunicable diseases, is not a nationally notifiable disease in the United States. The prevalence of ALS in the United States during(More)
Our objective was to evaluate the completeness of the United States National ALS Registry (Registry). We compared persons with ALS who were passively identified by the Registry with those actively identified in the State and Metropolitan Area ALS Surveillance project. Cases in the two projects were matched using a combination of identifiers, including,(More)
BACKGROUND The National ALS Registry is made up of two components to capture amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) cases: national administrative databases (Medicare, Medicaid, Veterans Health Administration and Veterans Benefits Administration) and self-identified cases captured by the Registry's web portal. This study describes self-reported characteristics(More)
Public health surveillance is an essential tool for assessing, controlling, and preventing disease. In the United States, public health surveillance has evolved from a focus on monitoring infectious diseases to also tracking injuries, chronic diseases, birth defects, environmentalandoccupationalexposures,andrisk factors.1 Despite this evolutionof(More)
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