Learn More
Orexins/hypocretins are key neuropeptides responsible for regulating central arousal and reward circuits. Two receptors respond to orexin signaling, orexin 1 receptor (OX(1)R) and orexin 2 receptor (OX(2)R) with partially overlapping nervous system distributions. Genetic studies suggest orexin receptor antagonists could be therapeutic for insomnia and other(More)
Orexin (hypocretin) neuropeptides promote wakefulness by signaling through two G-protein coupled receptors, Orexin 1 Receptor (OX(1)R) and Orexin 2 Receptor (OX(2)R). MK-6096 is an orally bioavailable potent and selective reversible antagonist of OX(1)R and OX(2)R currently in clinical development for insomnia. In radioligand binding and functional cell(More)
Orexin is a key neurotransmitter of central arousal and reward circuits in the CNS. Two receptors respond to orexin signaling, Orexin 1 Receptor (OX1R) and Orexin 2 Receptor (OX2R) with partially overlapping brain distributions. Genetic and pharmacological studies suggest orexin receptor antagonists could provide therapeutic benefit for insomnia and other(More)
Phosphodiesterase 10A (PDE10A) is a novel target for the treatment of schizophrenia that may address multiple symptomatic domains associated with this disorder. PDE10A is highly expressed in the brain and functions to metabolically inactivate the important second messengers cAMP and cGMP. Here we describe effects of a potent and orally bioavailable PDE10A(More)
Orexin signaling is essential for normal regulation of arousal and behavioral state control and represents an attractive target for therapeutics combating insomnia. Alternatively termed hypocretins, these neuropeptides were named to reflect sequence similarity to incretins and their potential to promote feeding. Current nomenclature reflects these molecular(More)
The kinesin spindle protein (KSP, also known as Eg5) is essential for the proper separation of spindle poles during mitosis, and inhibition results in mitotic arrest and the formation of characteristic monoaster spindles. Several distinct classes of KSP inhibitors have been described previously in the public and patent literature. However, most appear to(More)
Despite increased understanding of the biological basis for sleep control in the brain, few novel mechanisms for the treatment of insomnia have been identified in recent years. One notable exception is inhibition of the excitatory neuropeptides orexins A and B by design of orexin receptor antagonists. Herein, we describe how efforts to understand the origin(More)
Drugs targeting insomnia ideally promote sleep throughout the night, maintain normal sleep architecture, and are devoid of residual effects associated with morning sedation. These features of an ideal compound are not only dependent upon pharmacokinetics, receptor binding kinetics, potency and pharmacodynamic activity, but also upon a compound’s mechanism(More)
The field of small-molecule orexin antagonist research has evolved rapidly in the last 15 years from the discovery of the orexin peptides to clinical proof-of-concept for the treatment of insomnia. Clinical programs have focused on the development of antagonists that reversibly block the action of endogenous peptides at both the orexin 1 and orexin 2(More)
Orexin receptor antagonists have demonstrated clinical utility for the treatment of insomnia. The majority of clinical efforts to date have focused on the development of dual orexin receptor antagonists (DORAs), small molecules that antagonize both the orexin 1 and orexin 2 receptors. Our group has recently disclosed medicinal chemistry efforts to identify(More)