Paul J. Brindley

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Helminths are parasitic worms. They are the most common infectious agents of humans in developing countries and produce a global burden of disease that exceeds better-known conditions, including malaria and tuberculosis. As we discuss here, new insights into fundamental helminth biology are accumulating through newly completed genome projects and the(More)
Liver fl uke infection caused by Opisthorchis viverrini, O. felineus, and Clonorchis sinensis is a major public health problem in East Asia and Eastern Europe. Currently, more than 600 million people are at risk of infection with these trematodes [1]. O. viverrini is endemic in Southeast Asian countries, including Thailand, Lao People’s Democratic Republic,(More)
The food-borne trematodiases are an important group of neglected tropical diseases (NTDs). Over 40 million people are infected with food-borne trematodes and 750 million (>10% of the world's population) are at risk of these NTDs. Here, we review the life cycles, epidemiology, clinical manifestations, pathology and pathogenesis, diagnosis, treatment, and(More)
The two parasitic trematodes, Clonorchis sinensis and Opisthorchis viverrini, have a major impact on the health of tens of millions of humans throughout Asia. The greatest impact is through the malignant cancer ( = cholangiocarcinoma) that these parasites induce in chronically infected people. Therefore, both C. sinensis and O. viverrini have been(More)
Schistosoma japonicum causes schistosomiasis in humans and livestock in the Asia-Pacific region. Knowledge of the genome of this parasite should improve understanding of schistosome-host interactions, biomedical aspects of schistosomiasis and invertebrate evolution. We assigned 43,707 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) derived from adult S. japonicum and their(More)
The recent release of draft genome sequences of two of the major human schistosomes has underscored the pressing need to develop functional genomics approaches for these significant pathogens. The sequence information also makes feasible genome-scale investigation of transgene integration into schistosome chromosomes. Retrovirus-mediated transduction offers(More)
Microsporidia are single-celled, obligate intracellular parasites that were recently reclassified from protozoa to fungi. Microsporidia are considered a cause of emerging and opportunistic infections in humans, and species infecting humans also infect a wide range of animals, raising the concern for zoonotic transmission. Persistent or self-limiting(More)
Schistosomiasis is a neglected tropical disease caused by blood flukes (genus Schistosoma; schistosomes) and affecting 200 million people worldwide. No vaccines are available, and treatment relies on one drug, praziquantel. Schistosoma haematobium has come into the spotlight as a major cause of urogenital disease, as an agent linked to bladder cancer and as(More)
Schistosomes feed on human blood. They employ proteases to degrade hemoglobin from ingested erythrocytes, using the residues released for amino acid metabolism. However, the identity and the role of the participating protease(s) are unclear and controversial. Confocal microscopy localized schistosomal cathepsin D to the parasite gastrodermis, and revealed(More)
Liver fluke infection caused by Opisthorchis viverrini is a major public health problem in Thailand and the Lao People's Democratic Republic (Lao PDR; Laos). Currently, more than 600 million people are at risk of infection with these fish-borne trematodes and/or their close relatives. Opisthorchiasis has been studied extensively in Thailand, where about 8(More)