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  • Yiangos Yiangou, Paul Facer, +5 authors Praveen Anand
  • Medicine
  • BMC neurology
  • 2006 (First Publication: 2 March 2006)
  • BackgroundWhile multiple sclerosis (MS) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) are primarily inflammatory and degenerative disorders respectively, there is increasing evidence for shared cellularExpand
  • Ayesha Akbar, Yiangos Yiangou, Paul Facer, Julian R. F. Walters, Praveen Anand, Subrata Ghosh
  • Medicine
  • Gut
  • 2008 (First Publication: 4 February 2008)
  • Objective: The capsaicin receptor TRPV1 (transient receptor potential vanilloid type-1) may play an important role in visceral pain and hypersensitivity states. In irritable bowel syndrome (IBS),Expand
  • Paul Facer, Maria Anna Casula, +6 authors Praveen Anand
  • Medicine
  • BMC neurology
  • 2007 (First Publication: 23 May 2007)
  • BackgroundTransient receptor potential (TRP) receptors expressed by primary sensory neurons mediate thermosensitivity, and may play a role in sensory pathophysiology. We previously reported thatExpand
  • Philip J Matthews, Qasim Aziz, Paul Facer, John B. Davis, David G. Thompson, Praveen Anand
  • Medicine
  • European journal of gastroenterology & hepatology
  • 2004 (First Publication: 1 September 2004)
  • Background Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) patients commonly describe symptoms of heartburn and chest pain. The capsaicin receptor vanilloid receptor 1 (TRPV1) (VR1) is a cation channelExpand
  • Uma Anand, William R Otto, Paul Facer, Noureddine Zebda, Priya Anand
  • Medicine, Biology
  • Neuroscience Letters
  • 2008 (First Publication: 20 June 2008)
  • TRPA1 is a receptor expressed by sensory neurons, that is activated by low temperature (<17 degrees C) and plant derivatives such as cinnamaldehyde and isoeugenol, to elicit sensations includingExpand