Paul E. Dickson

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We describe an automatic classroom capture system that detects and records significant (stable) points in lectures by sampling and analyzing a sequence of screen capture frames from a PC used for presentations, application demonstrations, etc. The system uses visual inspection techniques to scan the screen capture stream to identify points to store. Unlike(More)
As the threat of terrorism becomes more prevalent, the need for technological innovations for tighter security rises. Some of the areas where security needs to be increased are at border customs stations, airports, federal buildings, embassies, sporting events, and the like where checkpoints are being set up to inspect vehicles coming onto the premises. The(More)
This paper describes a system designed to automatically capture classroom events as videos and images. This content is delivered in several ways, most commonly as indexed multimedia presentations but also in real time as notes of classroom events. This content creation system identifies when significant events occur, e.g., material presented by computer and(More)
This paper describes our experiences with the first partial deployment of Presentations Automatically Organized from Lectures (PAOL), a lecture recording system developed and tested at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. PAOL automatically records all information presented during lectures using any combination of computer, whiteboard, and overhead(More)
This paper evaluates the benefits and drawbacks of lecture recording, which aspects of lectures and lecture capture systems are most used, and what additional features and functions would make the experience more effective. We evaluated 4 computer science courses recorded during spring 2011 using our comprehensive lecture capture system PAOL and presented(More)
Hand-drawn memory diagrams are frequently used in computer science to demonstrate new programming concepts and support students' understanding of program functionality. These diagrams often vary among courses, instructors, and languages, which confuse students moving through the curriculum. Consistent memory diagrams throughout a curriculum not only(More)