Paul E. Atkinson

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In previous studies, the OECD has identified the main hallmarks of the crisis as too-big-to-fail institutions that took on too much risk, insolvency resulting from contagion and counterparty risk, the lack of regulatory and supervisory integration, and the lack of efficient resolution regimes. This article looks at how the Basel III proposals address these(More)
This article treats some ideas and issues that are part of ongoing reflection at the OECD. They were first raised in a major research article for the Reserve Bank of Australia conference in July 2008, and benefited from policy discussion in and around that conference. One fundamental cause of the crisis was a change in the business model of banking, mixing(More)
Since the crisis, even with massive support from governments and central banks, widespread regulatory changes and promises from bank executives to improve the governance of risk, the world continues to see failures of Globally Systemically Important Financial Institutions (G-SIFIs, like Dexia), and huge losses (most recently from JP Morgan). Banks refuse to(More)
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We discuss a set of practices surrounding the creation of Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) performed within a cell laboratory. This process exemplifies a wider imperative to render visible the work of laboratory science. The creation of visibly accountable practices in turn reflects and reinforces the wider trend towards standardisation of cell practice.(More)
The main hallmarks of the global financial crisis were too-big-to-fail institutions taking on too much risk with other people's money while gains were privatised and losses socialised. It is shown that banks need little capital in calm periods, but in a crisis they need too much – there is no reasonable ex-ante capital rule for large systemically important(More)
The main hallmarks of the global financial crisis were too-big-to-fail institutions taking on too much risk with other people's money: excess leverage and default pressure resulting from contagion and counterparty risk. This paper looks at whether the Basel III agreement addresses these issues effectively. Basel III has some very useful elements, notably a(More)
National accounts data provide the most comprehensive overview available of developments in national economies. They are of great interest to a wide range of users of economic information. These users, which include governments formulating budgetary policies, central banks making monetary policy decisions, businesses considering investment decisions and(More)
Man in a briefcase: the social construction of the laptop computer and the emergence of a type form Original Citation Atkinson, Paul (2005) Man in a briefcase: the social construction of the laptop computer and the emergence of a type form. Users may access full items free of charge; copies of full text items generally can be reproduced, displayed or(More)