Paul D. Robinson

Learn More
Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), characterized by cardiac dilatation and contractile dysfunction, is a major cause of heart failure. Inherited DCM can result from mutations in the genes encoding cardiac troponin T, troponin C, and alpha-tropomyosin; different mutations in the same genes cause hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. To understand how certain mutations(More)
BACKGROUND An increased prevalence of asthma/recurrent wheeze (RW), clinical allergy and allergic sensitisation up to age 13 years has previously been reported in subjects hospitalised with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) bronchiolitis in their first year of life compared with matched controls. A study was undertaken to examine whether these(More)
RATIONALE Idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is inherited in approximately one third of cases, usually as an autosomal dominant trait. More than 30 loci have been identified, several of which encode sarcomeric proteins which can also be mutated to cause hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. One contractile protein gene well known as a hypertrophic(More)
Inert gas washout tests, performed using the single- or multiple-breath washout technique, were first described over 60 years ago. As measures of ventilation distribution inhomogeneity, they offer complementary information to standard lung function tests, such as spirometry, as well as improved feasibility across wider age ranges and improved sensitivity in(More)
Inert gas washout was first described more than 60 years ago and 2 principal tests have been developed from it: the single breath and multiple breath washout (MBW) techniques. The invention of fast responding gas analysers almost 60 years ago and small computers 30 years later have facilitated breath-by-breath analysis and the development of sophisticated(More)
Dilated cardiomyopathy and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) can be caused by mutations in thin filament regulatory proteins of the contractile apparatus. In vitro functional assays show that, in general, the presence of dilated cardiomyopathy mutations decreases the Ca(2+) sensitivity of contractility, whereas HCM mutations increase it. To assess whether(More)
Distal arthrogryposes (DAs) are a group of disorders characterized by congenital contractures of distal limbs without overt neurological or muscle disease. Unexpectedly, mutations in genes encoding the fast skeletal muscle regulatory proteins troponin T (TnT), troponin I (TnI), and beta-tropomyosin (beta-TM) have been shown to cause autosomal dominant DA.(More)
OBJECTIVES We sought to further define the role of sarcomere mutations in dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and associated clinical phenotypes. BACKGROUND Mutations in several contractile proteins contribute to DCM, but definitive evidence for the roles of most sarcomere genes remains limited by the lack of robust genetic support. METHODS Direct sequencing(More)
Dilated cardiomyopathy and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) can be caused by mutations in thin filament regulatory proteins of the contractile apparatus. In vitro functional assays show that, in general, the presence of dilated cardiomyopathy mutations decreases the Ca sensitivity of contractility, whereas HCM mutations increase it. To assess whether this(More)
The inherited cardiac diseases hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) can both be caused by missense mutations in the TPM1 gene which encodes the thin filament regulatory protein α-tropomyosin. Different mutations are responsible for either HCM or DCM, suggesting that distinct changes in tropomyosin structure and function can(More)