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The main interconnect of the massively parallel Blue Genet/L is a three-dimensional torus network with dynamic virtual cut-through routing. This paper describes both the architecture and the microarchitecture of the torus and a network performance simulator. Both simulation results and hardware measurements are presented.
The Blue Genet/L computer is a massively parallel supercomputer based on IBM system-on-a-chip technology. It is designed to scale to 65,536 dual-processor nodes, with a peak performance of 360 teraflops. This paper describes the project objectives and provides an overview of the system architecture that resulted. We discuss our application-based approach(More)
An eightfold improvement in power efficiency can be achieved without loss of performance for modestly parallelizable CMOS-based computer systems. ABSTRACT | After decades of continuous scaling, further advancement of silicon microelectronics across the entire spectrum of computing applications is today limited by power dissipation. While the trade-off(More)
In December 1999, IBM announced the start of a five-year effort to build a massively parallel computer, to be applied to the study of biomolecular phenomena such as protein folding. The project has two main goals: to advance our understanding of the mechanisms behind protein folding via large-scale simulation, and to explore novel ideas in massively(More)
We present here a report produced by a workshop on " Addressing Failures in Exascale Computing " held in Park City, Utah, August 4–11, 2012. The charter of this workshop was to establish a common taxonomy about resilience across all the levels in a computing system; discuss existing knowledge on resilience across the various hardware and software layers of(More)
This paper gives an overview of the BlueGene/L Supercomputer. This is a jointly funded research partnership between IBM and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory as part of the United States Department of Energy ASCI Advanced Architecture Research Program. Application performance and scaling studies have recently been initiated with partners at a(More)
As 1999 ended, IBM announced its intention to construct a one-petaflop supercomputer. The construction of this system was based on a cellular architecture—the use of relatively small but powerful building blocks used together in sufficient quantities to construct large systems. The first step on the road to a petaflop machine (one quadrillion floating-point(More)