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—DASH is a small, lightweight, power autonomous robot capable of running at speeds up to 15 body lengths per second (see video). Drawing inspiration from biomechanics, DASH has a sprawled posture and uses an alternating tripod gait to achieve dynamic open-loop horizontal locomotion. The kinematic design which uses only a single drive motor and allows for a(More)
DASH+Wings is a small hexapedal winged robot that uses flapping wings to increase its locomotion capabilities. To examine the effects of flapping wings, multiple experimental controls for the same locomotor platform are provided by wing removal, by the use of inertially similar lateral spars, and by passive rather than actively flapping wings. We used(More)
The design of robots able to locomote effectively over a diversity of terrain requires detailed ground interaction models; unfortunately such models are lacking due to the complicated response of real world substrates which can yield and flow in response to loading. To advance our understanding of the relevant modeling and design issues, we conduct a(More)
—We study the detailed locomotor mechanics of a small, lightweight robot (DynaRoACH, 10 cm, 25 g) which can move on a granular substrate of closely packed 3 mm diameter glass particles at speeds up to 50 cm/s (5 body length/s), approaching the performance of small, high-performing, desert-dwelling lizards. To reveal how the robot achieves this high(More)
Escaping from predators often demands that animals rapidly negotiate complex environments. The smallest animals attain relatively fast speeds with high frequency leg cycling, wing flapping or body undulations, but absolute speeds are slow compared to larger animals. Instead, small animals benefit from the advantages of enhanced maneuverability in part due(More)
— A 10 cm hexapedal robot is adapted to dynamically climb near-vertical smooth surfaces. A gecko-inspired adhesive is mounted with an elastomer tendon and polymer loop to a remote-center-of-motion ankle that allows rapid engagement with the surface and minimizes peeling moments on the adhesive. The maximum velocity possible while climbing decreases as the(More)
We study the locomotor mechanics of a small, lightweight robot (DynaRoACH, 10 cm, 25 g) which can move on a granular substrate of 3 mm diameter glass particles at speeds up to 5 body length/s, approaching the performance of certain desert-dwelling animals. To reveal how the robot achieves this performance, we used high-speed imaging to capture its(More)
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