Patrick Varilly

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We describe the Phase II HapMap, which characterizes over 3.1 million human single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) genotyped in 270 individuals from four geographically diverse populations and includes 25-35% of common SNP variation in the populations surveyed. The map is estimated to capture untyped common variation with an average maximum r2 of between(More)
With the advent of dense maps of human genetic variation, it is now possible to detect positive natural selection across the human genome. Here we report an analysis of over 3 million polymorphisms from the International HapMap Project Phase 2 (HapMap2). We used 'long-range haplotype' methods, which were developed to identify alleles segregating in a(More)
Positive natural selection is the force that drives the increase in prevalence of advantageous traits, and it has played a central role in our development as a species. Until recently, the study of natural selection in humans has largely been restricted to comparing individual candidate genes to theoretical expectations. The advent of genome-wide sequence(More)
The C-C chemokine receptor 5, 32 base-pair deletion (CCR5-Delta32) allele confers strong resistance to infection by the AIDS virus HIV. Previous studies have suggested that CCR5-Delta32 arose within the past 1,000 y and rose to its present high frequency (5%-14%) in Europe as a result of strong positive selection, perhaps by such selective agents as the(More)
Pathogens have played a substantial role in human evolution, with past infections shaping genetic variation at loci influencing immune function. We selected 168 genes known to be involved in the immune response, genotyped common single nucleotide polymorphisms across each gene in three population samples (CEPH Europeans from Utah, Han Chinese from Guangxi,(More)
The C-C chemokine receptor 5, 32 base-pair deletion (CCR5-D32) allele confers strong resistance to infection by the AIDS virus HIV. Previous studies have suggested that CCR5-D32 arose within the past 1,000 y and rose to its present high frequency (5%–14%) in Europe as a result of strong positive selection, perhaps by such selective agents as the bubonic(More)
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