Patrick Reidy

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PURPOSE Four measures of children's developing robustness of phonological contrast were compared to see how they correlated with age, vocabulary size, and adult listeners' correctness ratings. METHOD Word-initial sibilant fricative productions from eighty-one 2- to 5-year-old children and 20 adults were phonetically transcribed and acoustically analyzed.(More)
Recently, speech researchers have begun to base spectral analyses of sibilant fricatives on modern spectral estimators that promise reduced error in the estimation of the spectrum of the acoustic waveform. In this paper we look at the effect that the choice of spectral estimator has on the estimation of spectral properties of English voiceless sibilant(More)
The English sibilant fricatives /s/ and /S/ are acquired late by normal hearing (NH) children, and pediatric cochlear implant (CI) users lag even further behind their NH peers. Previous work on the acquisition of sibilant fricatives by children with CIs has focused on their performance relative to NH controls, but the developmental trajectory of their(More)
This paper reports preliminary results of a study of the development of sibilant fricatives /s/ and /ʃ/ in young children. Results show that transcribed accuracy increased over the age range studied (28 to 39 months) and that children with larger vocabularies produced fricatives more accurately than ones with smaller vocabularies. Spectral characteristics(More)
OBJECTIVES Previous research has found that relative to their peers with normal hearing (NH), children with cochlear implants (CIs) produce the sibilant fricatives /s/ and /∫/ less accurately and with less subphonemic acoustic contrast. The present study sought to further investigate these differences across groups in two ways. First, subphonemic acoustic(More)
42 Objectives: Previous research has found that relative to their peers with normal hearing (NH), children with cochlear implants (CIs) produce the sibilant fricatives /s/ and /ʃ/ less accurately and with less subphonemic acoustic contrast. The present study sought to further investigate these differences across groups in two ways. First, subphonemic(More)
Both perceptual and acoustic studies of children’s speech independently suggest that phonological contrasts are continuously refined during acquisition. This paper considers two traditional acoustic features for the ‘s’-vs.-‘sh’ contrast (centroid and peak frequencies) and a novel feature learned from data, evaluating these features relative to perceptual(More)
Methods from automatic speech recognition (ASR), such as segmentation and forced alignment, have facilitated the rapid annotation and analysis of very large adult speech databases and databases of caregiver-infant interaction, enabling advances in speech science that were unimaginable just a few decades ago. This paper centers on two main problems that must(More)
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