Patrick Heymans

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Feature Diagrams (FD) are a family of popular modelling languages used to address the feature interaction problem, particularly in software product lines. FD were first introduced by Kang as part of the FODA (Feature Oriented Domain Analysis) method back in 1990. Afterwards, various extensions of FODA FD were introduced to compensate for a purported(More)
Feature diagrams are a popular means for documenting variability in software product line engineering. When examining feature diagrams in the literature and from industry, we observed that the same modelling concepts are used for documenting two different kinds of variability: (1) product line variability, which reflects decisions of product management on(More)
In product line engineering, systems are developed in <i>families</i> and differences between family members are expressed in terms of <i>features</i>. Formal modelling and verification is an important issue in this context as more and more critical systems are developed this way. Since the number of systems in a family can be exponential in the number of(More)
In the scientific community, feature models are the de-facto standard for representing variability in software product line engineering. This is different from industrial settings where they appear to be used much less frequently. We and other authors found that in a number of cases, they lack concision, naturalness and expressiveness. This is confirmed by(More)
The premise of variability-intensive systems, specifically in software product line engineering, is the ability to produce a large family of different systems efficiently. Many such systems are critical. Thorough quality assurance techniques are thus required. Unfortunately, most quality assurance techniques were not designed with variability in mind. They(More)
We study the problem of model checking software product line (SPL) behaviours against temporal properties. This is more difficult than for single systems because an SPL with <i>n</i> features yields up to 2<sup><i>n</i></sup> individual systems to verify. As each individual verification suffers from state explosion, it is crucial to propose efficient(More)
We present SNIP, an efficient model checker for software product lines (SPLs). Variability in software product lines is generally expressed in terms of features, and the number of potential products is exponential in the number of features. Whereas classical model checkers are only capable of checking properties against each individual product in the(More)
Feature models are a common way to represent variability in software product line engineering. For this purpose, most authors use a graphical notation based on FODA. The main drawback of those approaches is their lack of scalability: they generally do not fit real-size problems. Indeed, their graphical syntax does not account for attributes or complex(More)
Feature Diagrams (FD) are a family of popular modelling languages used for engineering requirements in sofware product lines. FD were first introduced by Kang as part of the FODA (Feature Oriented Domain Analysis) method back in 1990. Since then, various extensions of FODA FD were devised to compensate for a purported ambiguity and lack of precision and(More)
Large Software Product Lines (SPLs) are common in industry, thus introducing the need of practical solutions to test them. To this end, t-wise can help to drastically reduce the number of product configurations to test. Current t-wise approaches for SPLs are restricted to small values of t. In addition, these techniques fail at providing means to finely(More)