Patrick G Green

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Infusing natural killer (NK) cells following transplantation may allow less infections and relapse with little risk of acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD). We delivered 51 total NK cell-enriched donor lymphocyte infusions (DLIs) to 30 patients following a 3-6/6 HLA matched T cell-depleted nonmyeloablative allogeneic transplant. The primary endpoint of(More)
The irreversible anticholinesterase, di-isopropylfluorophosphate (DFP), was shown to be antinociceptive in the paw pressure test in rats only at doses where animals exhibited marked signs of anticholinesterase poisoning. At sub-antinociceptive doses DFP potentiated the opioid drugs fentanyl and alfentanil but failed to alter morphine antinociception. These(More)
Compounds which enhance cholinergic activity have been reported to interact with opioid drugs. We have shown, using the hot-plate test in mice that di-isopropylfluorophosphate potentiates the antinociceptive activity of alfentanil but has no effect on the activity of morphine or fentanyl. Administration of atropine and pralidoxime as a treatment for DFP(More)
Interactions between anticholinesterases and opioid drugs on antinociception and locomotor behaviour have been studied in the mouse. The anticholinesterase di-isopropylfluorophosphate (DFP) (1 mg/kg), pyridostigmine (1 mg/kg) and neostigmine (200 micrograms/kg) or drugs used to treat anticholinesterase poisoning (atropine, pralidoxime and diazepam) were not(More)
Di-isopropylfluorophosphate (DFP) displaced the opioid drug, alfentanil, from plasma proteins in-vivo and in-vitro in mice but was without effect on the structurally related compound, fentanyl. This action probably accounts for the enhanced entry of alfentanil into the brain of DFP-treated animals and its enhanced antinociceptive activity.
Di-isopropylfluorophosphate (DFP) potentiates the antinociceptive activity of alfentanil but has no effect on the activity of morphine or fentanyl. We have studied the effect of DFP on the distribution of these three opioids in the brain. Distribution studies were carried out using 3H-labelled opioids administered subcutaneously to mice. Animals were killed(More)
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