Patrick Coleman

Learn More
For believable character animation, skin deformation should communicate important deformation effects due to underlying muscle movement. Anatomical models that capture these effects are typically constructed from the inside out. Internal tissue is modeled by hand and a surface skin is attached to, or generated from, the internal structure. This paper(More)
Linear perspective is a good approximation to the format in which the human visual system conveys 3D scene information to the brain. Artists expressing 3D scenes, however, create nonlinear projections that balance their linear perspective view of a scene with elements of aesthetic style, layout and relative importance of scene objects. Manipulating the many(More)
We introduce staggered poses---a representation of character motion that explicitly encodes coordinated timing among movement features in different parts of a character's body. This representation allows us to provide sparse, pose--based controls for editing motion that preserve existing movement detail, and we describe how to edit coordinated timing among(More)
The modeling of natural phenomena is among the most challenging problems in computer animation. The difficulty arises from the complexity of the models used to describe the motion of these phenomena. Realistic modeling of fluid motion is difficult because of the variety of detail that must be considered to create a convincing animation. Various models of(More)
Hemorrhagic complications are common among he-modialysis (HD) patients. The mechanisms by which HD perturbs the coagulation cascade are still being defined. This study evaluated the influence of HD serum on cellular expression of tissue factor (TF), a procoagulant membrane-associated protein that is a pivotal regulator of blood coagulation. Serum was(More)
PROBLEM Mining in the United States remains one of the most hazardous industries, despite significant reductions in fatal injury rates over the last century. Coal mine fatality rates, for example, have dropped almost a thousand-fold since their peak in 1908. While incidence rates are very important indicators, lost worktime measures offer an alternative(More)