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Wearable fitness devices have demonstrated the capacity to improve overall physical activity, which can lead to physical and mental health improvements as well as quality of life gains. Although wheelchair athletes who participate in adaptive sports are interested in using wearable fitness trackers to capture their activity, we have observed low adoption of(More)
Power wheelchair users often use and carry multiple mobile computing devices. Many power wheelchair users have some upper body motor impairment that can make using these devices difficult. We believe that mobile device accessibility could be improved through designs that take into account users' functional abilities and take advantage of available space(More)
Interacting with touch screen-based computing devices can be difficult for individuals with mobility impairments that affect their hands, arms, neck, or head. These problems may be especially difficult for power wheelchair users, as the frame of their wheelchair may obstruct the users' range of motion and reduce their ability to reach objects in the(More)
For some individuals with executive function deficits, difficulties may be experienced when executing step-by-step procedures involving cognitive and motor skills. In this paper, we describe the design of a mobile application prototype, developed using a participatory-based approach, in order to enable individuals with executive function deficits to(More)
Interacting with touch screen-based computing devices can be difficult for individuals with mobility impairments that affect their hands, arms, neck, or head. These problems may be especially difficult for power wheelchair users, as the frame of their wheelchair may obstruct the users’ range of motion and reduce their ability to reach objects in the(More)
Imiquimod treatment of actinic keratoses (AK), usually highly effective, may yield squamous cell carcinoma of the keratoacanthoma type (SCC-KA), histopathologi-cally reminiscent of the multiple self-healing squamous carcinomas of Ferguson-Smith. In this regard, dermatosis locus minoris resistentiae (DLMR), meaning dermatosis in " place of less resistance "(More)
Power wheelchair users often use and carry multiple mobile computing devices. Many wheelchair users experience motor impairments that affect their hands, arms, neck, and head. Additionally, a power wheelchair user's ability to interact with computing technology may be physically restricted by the wheelchair's frame, which can obstruct movement or limit(More)
People with motor impairments experience a range of challenges when interacting with computers. While much prior research has explored the effects of motor impairments on accessing computer input devices, such as keyboards, mice, and touch screens, we know relatively little about how real world use of a wheelchair affects why people in power wheelchairs(More)
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