Learn More
The spiral is one of Nature's more ubiquitous shape: it can be seen in various media, from galactic geometry to cardiac tissue. In the literature, very specific models are used to explain some of the observed incarnations of these dynamic entities. Barkley [1, 2] first noticed that the range of possible spiral behaviour is caused by the Euclidean symmetry(More)
Spirals are common in Nature: the snail's shell and the ordering of seeds in the sunflower are amongst the most widely-known occurrences. While these are static, dynamic spirals can also be observed in excitable systems such as heart tissue, retina, certain chemical reactions, slime mold aggregates, flame fronts, etc. The images associated with these(More)
The spiral is one of Natures more ubiquitous shape: it can be seen in various media, from galactic geometry to cardiac tissue. Spirals have been studied from a dynamical system perspective starting with Barkley's seminal papers linking a wide class of spiral wave dynamics to the Euclidean symmetry of the excitable media in which they are observed [1,2]. But(More)
Spirals abound in excitable media. Various PDE models have been suggested in order to explain and predict some of the incarnations of these dynamic entities. In two landmark papers, Barkley [1, 2] noticed that a general family of these were caused by the Euclidean symmetry (inherent in the media) of the models. But the experimental universe is un-perfectly(More)
The spiral is one of Nature's more ubiquitous shape: it can be seen in various media, from galactic geometry to cardiac tissue. In the literature, very specific models are used to explain some of the observed incarnations of these dynamic entities. Barkley [1, 2] first noticed that the range of possible spiral behaviour is caused by the Euclidean symmetry(More)
  • 1