Patricia K. Sonsalla

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Recent epidemiological studies have established an association between the common consumption of coffee or other caffeinated beverages and a reduced risk of developing Parkinson's disease (PD). To explore the possibility that caffeine helps prevent the dopaminergic deficits characteristic of PD, we investigated the effects of caffeine and the adenosine(More)
Neurotoxic doses of methamphetamine (METH) can cause hyperthermia in experimental animals. Damage sustained to dopaminergic nerve terminals by this stimulant can be reduced by environmental cooling or by pharmacological manipulation which attenuates the hyperthermia. Many pharmacological agents with very diverse actions protect against METH-induced(More)
The systemic administration of either methamphetamine or 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) to experimental animals produces degenerative changes in nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons or their axon terminals. This study was conducted to determine if excitatory amino acids, which appear to be involved in various neurodegenerative disorders,(More)
Computer imaging and immunohistochemical staining techniques were used to determine which midbrain dopaminergic (DA) cells are spared in Parkinson's disease (PD), and in animals treated with the DA neurotoxin 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), and whether the spared cells contain the calcium-binding protein, calbindin-D28k (CaBP). The PD(More)
Parkinson's disease (PD) is associated with loss of total glutathione (GSH) which may contribute to progressive cell death. Peripheral GSH administration has been used clinically with reported benefits. Despite this, there is little specific information to characterize its cellular uptake or clearance, brain elevation with peripheral delivery or(More)
Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder whose etiology is not understood. This disease occurs both sporadically and through inheritance of single genes, although the familial types are rare. Over the past decade or so, experimental and clinical data suggest that PD could be a multifactorial, neurodegenerative disease that(More)
Mitochondrial dysfunction is observed in sporadic Parkinson's disease (PD) and may contribute to progressive neurodegeneration. While acute models of mitochondrial dysfunction have been used for many years to investigate PD, chronic models may better replicate the cellular disturbances caused by long-standing mitochondrial derangements and may represent a(More)
[3H]Dihydrotetrabenazine ([3H]DTBZ), a specific ligand for the vesicular monoamine transporter (VMAT2), has been used to characterize the integrity of monoaminergic nerve terminals in experimental animals and humans. The purpose of the present studies was to compare the loss of VMAT2 binding with the loss of other neurochemical markers of the dopamine (DA)(More)
Multiple administrations of high doses of methamphetamine to rats cause long-term depression of both dopamine and serotonin synthesis. Coadministration of the catecholamine synthesis inhibitor, alpha-methyl-p-tyrosine, antagonizes this effect of methamphetamine on both neurotransmitter systems. However, when catecholamine synthesis was maintained by the(More)
Previous studies have demonstrated that the effects of methamphetamine (METH) on dopaminergic and serotonergic systems are likely related to METH-induced increases in dopamine release. The ability of haloperidol to prevent these effects of METH suggests that dopamine receptor activation is involved in mediating these METH actions. The present studies were(More)