Patricia J. Keely

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BACKGROUND Stromal-epithelial interactions are of particular significance in breast tissue as misregulation of these interactions can promote tumorigenesis and invasion. Moreover, collagen-dense breast tissue increases the risk of breast carcinoma, although the relationship between collagen density and tumorigenesis is not well understood. As little is(More)
Transformation of mammary epithelial cells into invasive carcinoma results in alterations in their integrin-mediated responses to the extracellular matrix, including a loss of normal epithelial polarization and differentiation, and a switch to a more motile, invasive phenotype. Changes in the actin cytoskeleton associated with this switch suggest that the(More)
Breast epithelial cells differentiate into tubules when cultured in floating three-dimensional (3D) collagen gels, but not when the cells are cultured in the same collagen matrix that is attached to the culture dish. These observations suggest that the biophysical properties of collagenous matrices regulate epithelial differentiation, but the mechanism by(More)
Mammographically dense breast tissue is one of the greatest risk factors for developing breast carcinoma, yet the associated molecular mechanisms remain largely unknown. Importantly, regions of high breast density are associated with increased stromal collagen and epithelial cell content. We set out to determine whether increased collagen-matrix density, in(More)
BACKGROUND Mammographically dense breast tissue is one of the greatest risk factors for developing breast carcinoma. Despite the strong clinical correlation, breast density has not been causally linked to tumorigenesis, largely because no animal model has existed for studying breast tissue density. Importantly, regions of high breast density are associated(More)
Focal adhesions lie at the convergence of integrin adhesion, signaling and the actin cytoskeleton. Cells modify focal adhesions in response to changes in the molecular composition, two-dimensional (2D) vs. three-dimensional (3D) structure, and physical forces present in their extracellular matrix environment. We consider here how cells use focal adhesions(More)
Evidence for the potent influence of stromal organization and function on invasion and metastasis of breast tumors is ever growing. We have performed a rigorous examination of the relationship of a tumor-associated collagen signature-3 (TACS-3) to the long-term survival rate of human patients. TACS-3 is characterized by bundles of straightened and aligned(More)
Mechanotransduction is a key determinant of tissue homeostasis and tumor progression. It is driven by intercellular adhesions, cell contractility, and forces generated within the microenvironment and is dependent on extracellular matrix composition, organization, and compliance. We show that caveolin-1 (Cav1) favors cell elongation in three-dimensional(More)
Increased stromal collagen deposition in human breast tumours correlates with metastases. We show that activation of the collagen I receptor DDR2 (discoidin domain receptor 2) regulates SNAIL1 stability by stimulating ERK2 activity, in a Src-dependent manner. Activated ERK2 directly phosphorylates SNAIL1, leading to SNAIL1 nuclear accumulation, reduced(More)
Cells generate mechanical force to organize the extracellular matrix (ECM) and drive important developmental and reparative processes. Likewise, tumor cells invading into three-dimensional (3D) matrices remodel the ECM microenvironment. Importantly, we previously reported a distinct radial reorganization of the collagen matrix surrounding tumors that(More)