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Many metabolic and physiological processes display circadian oscillations. We have shown that the core circadian regulator, CLOCK, is a histone acetyltransferase whose activity is counterbalanced by the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+)-dependent histone deacetylase SIRT1. Here we show that intracellular NAD+ levels cycle with a 24-hour rhythm, an(More)
cAMP-responsive element modulator (CREM) expression is tissue specific and developmentally regulated. Here we report that CREM is unique within the family of cAMP-responsive promoter element (CRE)-binding factors since it is inducible by activation of the cAMP signaling pathway. The kinetic of expression is characteristic of an early response gene. The(More)
Circadian rhythms govern a large array of metabolic and physiological functions. The central clock protein CLOCK has HAT properties. It directs acetylation of histone H3 and of its dimerization partner BMAL1 at Lys537, an event essential for circadian function. We show that the HDAC activity of the NAD(+)-dependent SIRT1 enzyme is regulated in a circadian(More)
Transcription factor CREM appears to play a key physiological and developmental role within the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. This axis is modulated by the pineal hormone melatonin, whose production is in turn driven by the endogenous clock. There is striking circadian fluctuation of a novel CREM isoform, ICER, which is expressed at high levels(More)
Circadian rhythmicity in mammals is under the control of a molecular pacemaker constituted of clock gene products organized in transcriptional autoregulatory loops. Phase resetting of the clock in response to light involves dynamic changes in the expression of several clock genes. The molecular pathways used by light to influence pacemaker-driven(More)
Regulation of circadian physiology relies on the interplay of interconnected transcriptional-translational feedback loops. The CLOCK-BMAL1 complex activates clock-controlled genes, including cryptochromes (Crys), the products of which act as repressors by interacting directly with CLOCK-BMAL1. We have demonstrated that CLOCK possesses intrinsic histone(More)
The molecular machinery that governs circadian rhythmicity is based on clock proteins organized in regulatory feedback loops. Although posttranslational modification of clock proteins is likely to finely control their circadian functions, only limited information is available to date. Here, we show that BMAL1, an essential transcription factor component of(More)
Coffin-Lowry Syndrome (CLS) is an X-linked mental retardation condition associated with skeletal abnormalities. The gene mutated in CLS, RSK2, encodes a growth factor-regulated kinase. However, the cellular and molecular bases of the skeletal abnormalities associated with CLS remain unknown. Here, we show that RSK2 is required for osteoblast differentiation(More)
The mammalian circadian system contains both central and peripheral oscillators. To understand the communication pathways between them, we have studied the rhythmic behavior of mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) surgically implanted in mice of different genotypes. MEFs from Per1(-/-) mice have a much shorter period in culture than do tissues in the intact(More)