Paola Villa

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—In this work, we investigate a novel semantic approach for pattern discovery in trajectories that, relying on ontologies, enhances object movement information with event semantics. The approach can be applied to the detection of movement patterns and behaviors whenever the semantics of events occurring along the trajectory is, explicitly or implicitly,(More)
  • Sylvain Soriano, Paola Villa, Anne Delagnes, Ilaria Degano, Luca Pollarolo, Jeannette J. Lucejko +3 others
  • 2015
The classification of archaeological assemblages in the Middle Stone Age of South Africa in terms of diversity and temporal continuity has significant implications with respect to recent cultural evolutionary models which propose either gradual accumulation or discontinuous, episodic processes for the emergence and diffusion of cultural traits. We present(More)
  • Paola Villa, Luca Pollarolo, Ilaria Degano, Leila Birolo, Marco Pasero, Cristian Biagioni +5 others
  • 2015
Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, proteomic and scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDS) analyses of residue on a stone flake from a 49,000 year-old layer of Sibudu (South Africa) indicate a mixture of ochre and casein from milk, likely obtained by killing a lactating wild bovid. Ochre powder production and use(More)
Neandertals are the best-studied of all extinct hominins, with a rich fossil record sampling hundreds of individuals, roughly dating from between 350,000 and 40,000 years ago. Their distinct fossil remains have been retrieved from Portugal in the west to the Altai area in central Asia in the east and from below the waters of the North Sea in the north to a(More)
  • Paola Villa, Sylvain Soriano, Rainer Grün, Fabrizio Marra, Sebastien Nomade, Alison Pereira +4 others
  • 2016
We present here the results of a technological and typological analysis of the Acheulian and early Middle Paleolithic assemblages from Torre in Pietra (Latium, Italy) together with comparisons with the Acheulian small tools of Castel di Guido. The assemblages were never chronometrically dated before. We have now 40Ar/39Ar dates and ESR-U-series dates,(More)
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