Paola Di Nicola

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It is well accepted that the best feeding method for infants is breastfeeding, due to its numerous biological and clinical effects on child and maternal health. The use of medication by the nursing mother and the physician's advice to stop nursing are the most common reasons for the cessation of breastfeeding. The physician plays an extremely delicate role(More)
Due to increased social awareness of allergens and population hyper-sensitization, the reported incidence of allergic reactions to food allergens has increased over the past two decades. Cow's milk proteins (CMPs) are among the most common food allergens. The aim of this study was to use proteomics techniques to investigate cow's milk allergens in both(More)
It is well known that breastfeeding is beneficial both for its nutritional properties and for the presence of biologically active compounds. Among these, human milk oligosaccharides (HMOs), representing the third largest fraction of human milk, have been assigned important biological functions, such as prebiotic and immunomodulatory and antimicrobial(More)
Mother's own milk is widely recognized as the optimal feeding for term infants, but also provides health benefits that are of vital importance for sick and preterm infants in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs), even though the growth and neurodevelopmental needs of very premature infants are best met by appropriate fortification of human milk (HM). When(More)
Preterm Infants' survival has greatly increased in the last few decades thanks to the improvement in obstetrical and neonatal care. These neonates constitute the large majority of the population in neonatal intensive care units. The correct evaluation of postnatal growth of these babies is nowadays of primary concern, although the definition of their(More)
Postnatal growth restriction and failure to thrive still remain a major problem in Extremely Low Birth Weight (ELBW) infants . The goal for the nutritional care of these infants is to achieve rate of growth similar to those of the fetus in utero at the equivalent gestational age. Human milk fortified remains the best food for all these preterms. Two groups(More)
The past two decades have seen a progressive improvement in the survival rates of preterm infants, especially in neonates <30 weeks of gestational age. These neonates constitute the large majority of the population in neonatal intensive care units. The correct evaluation of postnatal growth of these babies is nowadays of primary concern, although the(More)
The ability to recognize abnormal growth at birth and/or an intrauterine malnutrition is of great importance for neonatal care and prognosis. The current gold standard in neonatal auxological evaluation is based on information obtained from both neonatal anthropometric charts and intrauterine growth charts. Numerous charts have been proposed, but they are(More)
Benefits of breastfeeding are widely recognized, during the last decades human milk has been identified as the normative standard for infant feeding and nutrition. Recent evidence focused on specific bioactive and immunomodulatory factors, such as oligosaccharides, lactose, glycosaminoglycans of human milk and the variability of their concentrations during(More)
Cow's milk proteins (CMPs) are among the best characterized food allergens. Cow's milk contains more than twenty five different proteins, but only whey proteins alpha-lactalbumin, beta-lactoglobulin, bovine serum albumin (BSA), and lactoferrin, as well as the four caseins, have been identified as allergens. Aim of this study was to investigate by proteomics(More)