Pamela P. Auerbach

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The startle reflex is inhibited when the starting noise is preceded 30-500 msec by a weak prepulse. "Prepulse inhibition" (PPI) is reduced in specific neuropsychiatric disorders characterized clinically by impaired inhibition of sensory, motor, or cognitive information. PPI is sexually dimorphic, with men exhibiting significantly more PPI than women. We(More)
Despite the similarities of prepulse inhibition (PPI) of the startle reflex and its apparent neural regulation in rodents and humans, it has been difficult to demonstrate cross-species homology in the sensitivity of PPI to pharmacologic challenges. PPI is disrupted in rats by the indirect dopamine (DA) agonist amphetamine, and while studies in humans have(More)
Prepulse inhibition (PPI), a measure of sensorimotor gating, is reduced in schizophrenia patients and in rats treated with dopamine (DA) agonists. Reported strain and supplier-based differences in sensitivity to PPI-disruptive effects of DA agonists presumably reflect the differential impact of genetics and/or environment on DAergic substrates regulating(More)
Rationale: Prepulse inhibition (PPI), a cross-species measure of sensorimotor gating, is impaired in certain neuropsychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia. This study was designed to assess the effects of the D2-family agonist pergolide in rats, in anticipation of human studies of the dopaminergic regulation of PPI. Methods: The effects of pergolide(More)
Prepulse inhibition of the startle reflex is an operational measure of sensorimotor gating that is impaired in schizophrenia patients and dopamine agonist-treated rats. Previous reports demonstrated an enhanced sensitivity to the prepulse inhibition-disruptive effects of the D(1)/D(2) agonist apomorphine in adult rats four weeks after cytotoxic lesions of(More)
Sensorimotor gating, measured by prepulse inhibition (PPI) of the startle reflex, is reduced in schizophrenia patients and in rats treated with dopamine agonists. Strain differences in the sensitivity to the PPI-disruptive effects of dopamine agonists may provide insight into the genetic basis for human population differences in sensorimotor gating. We(More)
Genetic differences in the neurochemical regulation of PPI in rats may help clarify the neural basis of inherited PPI differences in neuropsychiatric disorders. We reported and characterized substantial heritable differences in sensitivity to PPI-disruptive effects of DA agonists in outbred Sprague Dawley (SDH) versus Long-Evans (LEH) rats. Other strains(More)
Abstract Background. We recently reported that prepulse inhibition (PPI) in humans was increased by the dopamine (DA) agonist/N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) antagonist amantadine (200 mg), but was not significantly altered by the DA agonist bromocriptine (1.25–2.5 mg). PPI-enhancing effects of DA agonists occur in rats under specific stimulus conditions,(More)
Rationale: Prepulse inhibition (PPI), a cross–species measure of sensorimotor gating, is impaired in certain neuropsychiatric disorders. This study was designed to assess caffeine effects on PPI in normal humans, as part of an effort to understand cross-species differences and similarities in the neurochemical regulation of PPI. Methods: Startle was(More)
The acoustic startle reflex is normally inhibited when the startling stimulus is preceded by a weak prepulse. We studied "prepulse inhibition" (PPI) to assess potential gender differences in this operational measure of sensorimotor gating. A review of data from our previously published studies in psychiatric patients and normal controls indicated that(More)