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Accumulation of amyloid fibrils in the viscera and connective tissues causes systemic amyloidosis, which is responsible for about one in a thousand deaths in developed countries. Localized amyloid can also have serious consequences; for example, cerebral amyloid angiopathy is an important cause of haemorrhagic stroke. The clinical presentations of(More)
Systemic amyloidosis is a fatal disease caused by misfolding of native globular proteins, which then aggregate extracellularly as insoluble fibrils, damaging the structure and function of affected organs. The formation of amyloid fibrils in vivo is poorly understood. We recently identified the first naturally occurring structural variant, D76N, of human(More)
The mechanisms underlying transthyretin-related amyloidosis in vivo remain unclear. The abundance of the 49-127 transthyretin fragment in ex vivo deposits suggests that a proteolytic cleavage has a crucial role in destabilizing the tetramer and releasing the highly amyloidogenic 49-127 truncated protomer. Here, we investigate the mechanism of cleavage and(More)
Background: Amyloidogenic D76N ␤ 2 m variant escapes the intracellular quality control despite its instability. Results: We show tridimensional structure and stability of D76N ␤ 2 m assembled within MHCI compared with the wild type protein. Conclusion: Assembly of D76N ␤ 2 m within the MHCI totally masks its misfolding propensity. Significance: The(More)
BACKGROUND We have recently discovered that the two tryptophans of human β2-microglobulin have distinctive roles within the structure and function of the protein. Deeply buried in the core, Trp95 is essential for folding stability, whereas Trp60, which is solvent-exposed, plays a crucial role in promoting the binding of β2-microglobulin to the heavy chain(More)
The conversion of α-synuclein from its intrinsically disordered monomeric state into the fibrillar cross-β aggregates characteristically present in Lewy bodies is largely unknown. The investigation of α-synuclein variants causative of familial forms of Parkinson disease can provide unique insights into the conditions that promote or inhibit aggregate(More)
The human pentraxin proteins, serum amyloid P component (SAP) and C-reactive protein (CRP) are important in routine clinical diagnosis, SAP for systemic amyloidosis and CRP for monitoring the non-specific acute phase response. They are also targets for novel therapies currently in development but their roles in health and disease are controversial. Thus,(More)
Wild-type and variant forms of transthyretin (TTR), a normal plasma protein, are amyloidogenic and can be deposited in the tissues as amyloid fibrils causing acquired and hereditary systemic TTR amyloidosis, a debilitating and usually fatal disease. Reduction in the abundance of amyloid fibril precursor proteins arrests amyloid deposition and halts disease(More)
Apolipoprotein C-III deficiency provides cardiovascular protection, but apolipoprotein C-III is not known to be associated with human amyloidosis. Here we report a form of amyloidosis characterized by renal insufficiency caused by a new apolipoprotein C-III variant, D25V. Despite their uremic state, the D25V-carriers exhibit low triglyceride (TG) and(More)
To form extracellular aggregates, amyloidogenic proteins bypass the intracellular quality control, which normally targets unfolded/aggregated polypeptides. Human D76N β2-microglobulin (β2m) variant is the prototype of unstable and amyloidogenic protein that forms abundant extracellular fibrillar deposits. Here we focus on the role of the class I major(More)